War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0906 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC, Chapter XXXIX.

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I requested Mr. Smith, my most efficient clerk, to announce the names. He took my place. I spoke to the policemen, and directed them to take places near the railing, and stated that I thought for the present no danger was to be apprehended. I then went into the back room, and, after a few minutes` consultation with my specials, turned to assume my place at the wheel. As I did so, I heard shouts, "They are coming, " and the like. Instantly the windows and front of the house were broken in by paving stones. I stepped forward, but was borne back by the mass, and pushed through the back door into the back yard, and took refuge in the next building. The mob immediately took possession of the premises and set fire to them. What is the present condition of things I cannot say. I trust my papers are safe. I shall report in full by mail. I can only say that if Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General Colonel Robert Nugent remains in office, I shall ask leave to resign. The city ought to be placed under martial law, with General Harvey Brown or Benjamin F. Butler as military commandant.

CHAS. E. JENKINS,

Captain, and Provost-Marshal, Ninth District.

Colonel J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

NEW YORK, July 14, 1863.

SIR: I had the honor to communicate to you by telegraph yesterday the fact of the destruction of my headquarters, together with such details as then occurred to me, and stated that I should report in full by mail to-day. But the state of my health is such that I am at present unable to discharge my duty in this respect. My safe has been preserved, and I presume its contents are not much injured. It lies, I am told, amid the ruins of the building, locked, and the key in my possession. The mob was unable to open it. I regret to state that some of my enrolling officers are reported to have been severely injured. Mr. Vanderpoel, my chief clerk, was terribly beaten with clubs, and now lies at his father`s house in a very critical condition. At the time of writing my dispatch yesterday, I was in a state of intense excitement, and made some harsh statements concerning Colonel Robert Nugent, which I desire to recall. Subsequent examination and reflection have satisfied me that I was in error.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. E. JENKINS,

Captain, and Provost-Marshal, Ninth District, New York.

Colonel J. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

NEW YORK, July 21, 1863.

(Received 12. 35 p. m.)

SIR: I got my safe out yesterday afternoon. It is much damaged; have just opened it; contents much charred, but think, with care, I can get copy of consolidated lists; perhaps slips can be used.

CHAS. E. JENKINS,

Captain, &c.

Colonel J. B. FRY.