War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0893 Chapter XXXIX. DRAFT RIOTS IN NEW YORK CITY, ETC.

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NEW YORK, July 17, 1863-3. 45 p. m. (Received 3. 50 p. m.)

SIR: Up to this hour the city continues very quiet. The following is a synopsis of the remarks by Archbishop Hughes up to 2. 45 p. m.: I do not address you as the President, nor as a military commander, nor as the mayor, but as your father. You know that for years back I have been your friend I have stood by you with my voice and with my pen. Now, as to the causes of this unhappy excitement. Some of your grievances I know are imaginary ones, though, unfortunately, many are real. Yet I know of no country under the sun that has not more cause for a just complaint than we have in this. The archbishop, who is in excellent voice, has entire control of the sympathies of the crowd of three or four thousand people. Respectfully,

E. S. SANFORD.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

NEW YORK CITY, July 18, 1863-1. 30 p. m. (Received 1. 45 p. m.)

SIR: The plunder rioting is suppressed for the present, but there are strong indications of a formidable and widespread organization to resist the taking away of conscripts under the draft. This organization assumes a party aspect, and extends to the military of the city who are subject to draft. The party supposed to be most interested in sustaining the Government and draft, and the property-holders, show no intention to prepare for the emergency or to fight when it comes. I give you this information, obtained by personal observation, to enable you to appreciate the position, and trust you will not consider it officious.

E. S. SANFORD.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

Numbers 3. Report of Colonel James B. Fry, Provost-Marshal-General, U. S. Army, with orders, &c.

PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL`S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., July 14, 1863.

SIR: The enforcement of the draft was yesterday seriously resisted in the ninth district of the city of New York. The mob, variously estimated in numbers up as 30, 000, attacked the officers of this bureau in the performance of their duty, and destroyed the building in which the draft had been conducted, and many of the rolls, records, and appurtenances connected with the draft. The military and the police force of the city on duty there were overwhelmed and dispersed. In the present condition of things. I do not think the draft can be made without additional force. I therefore recommend that four regiments of infantry and a battery of artillery be sent immediately