War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0892 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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NEW YORK, July 17, 1863. (Received 10. 50 a. m.)

SIR: The situation this morning is similar to yesterday. Business is going forward in most parts of the city. No further attack has been made on our telegraph wires, and we are in connection with Boston. The rioters made a harder fight last night than at any previous time, but were thoroughly whipped. I will endeavor to obtain and transmit more detailed information.

Respectfully,

E. S. SANFORD.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

NEW YORK, July 17, 1863. (Received 2. 07 p. m.)

SIR: Police Commissioner [Thomas C.] Acton reports that in a fight last night near Gramercy Park, the soldiers got the worst of it, and were driven back, leaving one of their number killed. Captain Putnam, of the regulars, started with two companies, and thoroughly routed the rioters, killing from 15 to 25, taking 16 prisoners, and bringing off the body of the sergeant, which was left at the first fight. Police Commissioner Acton desires to make a special request for the promotion of Captain Putnam, Company F, Twelfth U. S. Infantry, this being the second time that he has encountered and overcome the rioters after they had gotten the better of our troops under other officers. No disturbance has occurred this morning in any part of the city.

Respectfully,

E. S. SANFORD.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 17, 1863-3. 40 p. m.

Police Commissioner ACTON, New York City:

SIR: The courage and gallantry of Captain Putnam, of the Twelfth Infantry, and of the soldiers of his command, against the rebel rioters in New York, has been unofficially communicated to this Department. Suitable acknowledgment will be made as soon as an official report is received. In the meantime, please to communicate to him, and the officers and soldiers who have acted under him, the thanks of this Department. Your board will also please report all cases of gallantry and courage that may come to your knowledge, by officers or privates, in order that the Department may proper acknowledgment.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.