War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0880 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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to patrol in such parts of the city as may be in the greatest danger from the rioters. This ought to be done as soon as practicable. JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General. After this had been issued, General Sandford reported to me that his orders were not obeyed by General Brown; consequently, I issued the following:

ORDERS.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, New York, July 1`3, 1863. All the troops called out for the protection of the city are placed under the command of Major-General Sandford, whose orders they will implicitly obey. By command of Major-General Wool:

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

About 9 o`clock in the evening of the same day (13th), after this order had been issued, General Brown presented himself to me, complaining of General Sandford, and strongly objecting to serve under him, asking to be excused from the operation of the order. My reply was to the effect that as General Sandford ranked him, and the troops were mixed, of militia, regulars, &c., I could not place him (General Brown) in command of all, and that for efficient operations a hearty co-operation of the State and United Stated troops and the police must be had for putting down the mob, protecting public and private property, and the lives of the citizens threatened. General Brown, however, persisted, notwithstanding, in urging his objections and asking to be excused. I excused him, and immediately issued the following order:

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, New York City, July 13, 1863.

Colonel R. Nugent will take charge of all the regular troops, subject to the orders of Major-General Sandford.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

The following morning (July 14), about 8 o`clock, after myself and staff had been up all night, receiving and posting the troops, General Brown again presented himself, and asked to be restored to the position he had relinquished the evening before, saying in substance that he considered himself wrong in having refused to serve under General Sandford, and that, if he could be restored, he would be willing to serve as ordered. I immediately granted his request, and General Brown soon after resumed his place at the police headquarters, Colonel Nugent being directed to serve under the orders of General Brown, but not to be relieved from duty; and I issued the following order:

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, New York City, July 14, 1863.

Bvt. Brigadier General HARVEY BROWN, U. S. Army:

SIR: It is reported that the rioters have already recommenced their work of destruction. To-day there must be no child`s play. Some of the troops under your command should be sent immediately to attack and stop those who have commenced their infernal rascality in Yorkville and Harlem.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

Notwithstanding General Brown`s expressed willingness, in case of being restored, to serve in accordance with my orders, I regret being obliged to state that he afterward evinced no disposition to