War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0878 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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Major-General Dix. I also requested to be ordered to Troy, and there await orders, which I hope will receive your approval.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, New York City, July 20, 1863.

SIR: Herewith you will receive a report relating to the recent riot in this city. You will perceive that I have not mentioned the killed and wounded, and for the reason that I have not been able to obtain a correct account of number. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, New York City, July 20, 1863.

SIR: In order that you may correctly understand the course pursued to check the rioters who commenced their opposition to law, and began their depredations in this city on the 13th instant, and at one time by their killing persons, pulling down and firing buildings to such an extent as to cause many to apprehend a general conflagration, I have the honor to present the following report: The cause ascribed for this riot has been the attempt on the part of the assistant provost-marshals to make the draft on that day at the various offices in the city. The operations of enrolling and drafting under the conscript act have been independent of the military commander of the department, and almost entirely under the control of the Provost-Marshal-General. On Monday morning, 13th instant, hearing of some disturbance in the upper part of this city, I saw Colonel Nugent, provost-marshal of this city, and called his attention to the subject, when he informed me that the police of the city had already attended to it, and he required no other assistance; that the trouble had already subsided, and that I need give myself no further uneasiness on the subject. I then proceeded to transact important business at the lower part of the city, after completing which, on returning to my headquarters, I was informed that the mayor wished to see me on business of moment. I called upon him. when he informed me that a serious riot existed in some of the upper wards of the city, and asked me for assistance to quell it, saying that nearly all the militia force of the city had been sent to Harrisburg, to defend Pennsylvania from the rebel invasion. From his representations of the imminent danger, not only in regard to the threatened destruction of property and lives of citizens, but also of the property of the United States, which ways very large, and required immediate protection, and believing that to protect the public property from destruction it was necessary to put down the rioters. I immediately complied with the request of the mayor, and issued orders for the troops under my command in the forts of the