War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0876 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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muskets have been used by us, and some 60 persons among the rioters have been (as reported) killed and wounded. With the very small force I had in the forts, and with the help of such citizens as were willing to enroll themselves, we have accomplished much, and, I think, have made an impression on the rioters which I hope will stay their purposes; but they make great threats if the draft is not abandoned.

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

NEW YORK, July 16, 1863-1 a. m. (Received 1, 50 a. m.)

SIR: Many thanks for the glorious news of the surrender of Port Hudson. We have been engaged night and day in suppressing the insurrection in New York. Some 50 or 60 rioters have been killed and wounded. I think we shall put it down to-morrow, if it is not at the present time. A fire is now raging in Brooklyn. The storehouses are on fire, and the shipping is in danger. Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it. A large number of houses have been plundered and many burned.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, July 16, 1863. (Received 10. 10 p. m.)

SIR: During the day the rioters and robbers were quiet. A large number assembled near Gramercy Park this evening. They have been driven from the houses, a number of which they sacked. I think we will close the affair to-morrow. Three regiments arrived this afternoon, and one yesterday, with two howitzers. We will probably receive two more to-morrow. A considerable number of rioters have been killed and wounded. We have lost 3 officers and some 28 men wounded, besides a few killed.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON. NEW YORK CITY, July 17, 1863. (Received 10. 45 a. m.)

SIR: I think we shall put down the riot in this city in the course of this day. We had a brush with them last night, and they were dispersed. In searching their houses, we found 70 carbines, revolvers, &c., and barrels of paving stones. The numbers of the rioters are very great, but scattered about in different parts of the city, where they plunder houses whenever the opportunity offers, in the absence of troops. The several regiments which arrived yesterday afternoon and evening will, I trust, enable us to crush all these parties in the course