War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0824 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

Search Civil War Official Records

service there. My information that there were about 8, 000 men at the South Anna, prepared for General Getty's attack, is, therefore, perfectly consistent with the letter of Hefferson Davis and corroborating intelligence from other sources. In review, I beg leave to say that the objects in contemplation of your order of the 14th June were substantially accomplished; that the railroad connection between General Lee and Richmond was effectually broken; that a large force of the enemy was occupied, and that very severe injury was inflicted on him. My position at the White House was one from which the enemy could have been greatly annoyed had the public necessities elsewhere allowed me to retain it. The time required to pass General Getty's column across the river led me to plank over the railroad for the passage of supply trains and artillery, and by means of this facility the whole country could have been controlled from the Pamunkey to the Rappahannock, either by holding the bridge and operating from the White House, or by crossing my whole force, destroying the bridge, making West Point the base of my movement, and avoiding the long and circuitous navigation of the Pamunkey below the White House. With the aid of a pontoon bridge, the Pamunkey can be crossed at New Castle Ferry or Hanovertown, each about 15 or 16 miles from Richmond, 8 or 9 miles nearer than the White House. I inclose herewith the reports of Major-General Keyes and Brigadier-General Getty, giving a detailed account of their movements. The loss of General Keyes was 25 killed, wounded, and missing, and of General Getty, 2 killed and 7 wounded. I desire to acknowledge the zeal and promptitude of the officers and men under my command in the performance of all their duties. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS, Fort Monroe, July 12, 1863.

GENERAL: In a dispatch to the Secretary of War from the York River, on the 8th instant, I stated that - The force found at the South Anna was greatly augmented by the failure of the demonstration under General Keyes against Richmond by way of Bottom's Bridge. The attack on Bottom's Bridge was ordered to be made on the 1st July, the day General Getty was sent up the Pamunkey to destroy the Fredericksburg Railroad bridge over the South Anna, and was intended to cover that movement. The attack was not made. The inclosed correspondence between Major-General Keyes and myself shows the facts. I send it without comment, and desire it to be considered a part of my report, which will be made as soon as I receive General Getty's. I expect him here to-day with his command, which has marched from the White House. I request that the correspondence may be placed on file, to guard against any misapprehension in the interim.

I am, very, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.