War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0819 Chapter XXXIX. EXPEDITIONS TO SOUTH ANNA RIVER, VA., ETC.

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multiplied the enemy's force two or three times, for his representations do not accord with the condition of things shown in Davis' letter to Lee. * The great murmuring in every quarter at the waste of force in your command will probably be a good deal aggravated by this last disappointment.

EDWIN M. STANTON. YORKTOWN, VA., July 8, 1863-4 p. m.

SIR: I sent Generals Getty and Foster, and Colonel Spear, three of my best officers, on the last expedition. The evidence as to the enemy's force was shown to me last evening, and will be given in Getty's report. He arrived last evening, and left this morning on the march to Yorktown, in execution of General Halleck's order of the 3d. The force found at the South Anna was greatly augmented by the failure of the demonstration under General Keyes against Richmond, by way of Bottom's Bridge.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

YORKTOWN, VA., July 8, 1863-4 p. m.,

Via FORT MONROE, VA.

SIR: I have received your dispatch. No change in orders. The last of Getty's wagons crossed the Pamunkey at sunset last evening. At sunrise this morning, the whole was in motion toward Yorktown. I saw everything off, and left at 12 m. Not an hour will be lost in sending you troops. The heavy rains are making very bad roads.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WHITE HOUSE, VA., July 8, 1863.

SIR: Thank God for giving us Vicksburg! I am breaking up here to-day, but with great regret. I have planked over the railroad bridge, and can pass artillery and supply trains, controlling the whole country between the Pamunkey and Rappahannock. Richmond and the neighboring counties are in a ferment. The moment I leave, the troops there will be ready to operate elsewhere. If Lee is broken up, and I can have 20, 000 men, I can go into Richmond. I have not delayed a compliance with your order, but hoped that changed relations might keep me here.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

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*Of June 28, 1863, which was captured by the Union scouts, and telegraphed by Butterfield to Halleck July 3, and thence communicated to the several army commanders. See Part I, p. 75.

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