War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0808 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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view of the field, I saw no movement on the part of Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn. I then had my artillery, supported by Captain [John D.] Neal, with his and parts of two other companies (Captain Marshall also being in position to support), placed in position on a hill opposite the position of the enemy, about 1 mile distant, and then commenced an artillery duel (hoping that time would be given to Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn to come up and take part), in which the enemy had the advantage of position, number of pieces, and quality of ammunition. Not more than one in fifteen of our shells exploded. No material damage was inflicted or incurred. Our howitzer was slightly disabled by a piece of shell, but was soon repaired. The enemy occupied a very strong position on Butcher's Hill, in the rear of the town, near the Phillipi road. I felt confident in the ability of my force, without the assistance of that under Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn, to drive them from that position; bus as my object was to capture, not to run them, I delayed the assault, hoping to hear from and to see Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn, until it became too dark to operate. In the meantime, I made every effort to find the whereabouts of Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn; but he was not to be found. During the night, I ordered Major Stewart back a short distance to a safe position, holding the ground I had obtained during the day in the front. Early the next morning (the 3rd instant), having heard nothing from Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn, I determined to assault the position of the enemy. Accordingly, I ordered Major Stewart up to the position he held the evening before. In advancing to do so, the skirmish referred to in his report occurred. I dismounted a considerable portion of my cavalry, and was moving to the assault, when I discovered a large re-enforcement coming to the enemy on the Phillipi road, and was also advised of the same by Major Lady and Captain Marshall. My own opinion is that the re-enforcement received numbered at least 700; others and prisoners estimate it at a greater number. I saw about 700 mounted men entering the place. Having now become satisfied that, if Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn ever reached the position to which he was ordered, he had fallen back, and that it was imprudent to continue the attack, I made demonstrations in front for four hours, in the meantime drawing in the forces under the command of Majors stewart and Lady, and sending scouts to communicate with Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn. At 2 p. m. of Friday, the 3rd instant, I slowly retired in a manner to prevent my being flanked or the enemy reaching my rear. The enemy did not follow me on that day, and abut 9 p. m. I went into camp at the Crouch fortifications with my infantry and artillery, posting my cavalry between that point and Huttonsville. It is proper here to state that Major J. R. Claiborne, with a detachment of 100 mounted men of Dunn's battalion, who on the way was ordered to follow me (which order, left at Warm Springs, he did not receive, and without it was coming up to re-enforce me), was met, as I was falling back, about 6 miles this side of Beverly. I left him in the rear during Friday night, as his men and horses were comparatively fresh. In the morning (the 4th instant), I received dispatch, Numbers 1, from Lieutenant-Colonel Dunn, a copy of which,

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* and copies of dispatched Nos. 2* and 3, + are herewith inclosed. I immediately ordered Major *Not found. +See Report Numbers 4, p. 812.

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