War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0735 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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defend would have been left utterly exposed. I acted according to orders and the dictates of judgment. I came to this army resolved that my official conduct should meet the approbation of my military superiors, and whenever in their opinion I deserve censure, I shall most cheerfully submit to official investigation.

Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant,

B. H. ROBERTSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Cavalry.

Major H. B. MCCLELLAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. Cavalry Division.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION, June 15, 1863.

Respectfully forwarded.

It is very clear that General Robertson intended to do what was right. At the time Lieutenant Johnson reported to me, it was too late for any movements to have been made from General Robertson's front, and it would have been extremely hazardous for him to have interposed his command between the enemy's infantry and artillery and the column of cavalry that had already passed on his right flank. At the time he arrived on the spot, it is presumed he could have made the detachment to get to the front of the flanking column and delay its progress.

J. E. B. STUART,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION, June 15, 1863.

MAJOR: Early on the morning of the 9th instant, Captain White, commanding outposts, reported the enemy crossing in force at Kelly's Ford with cavalry and infantry, three regiments of the latter having passed at the time this dispatch was written. I immediately announced this intelligence to the major-general commanding, and shortly afterward received instructions to proceed with my command in that direction, to hold the enemy in check, and protect the right flank of our forces, then engaged between Rappahannock and Beverly Fords. Another courier from Captain White informed me that five regiments of infantry, several regiments of cavalry, with artillery, had crossed, and were moving slowly up the river. I at once dispatched this information to headquarters. About 2 miles from Kelly's, I met Captain White, and learned that the enemy was then occupying a piece of woods directly in our front. Dismounting a portion of my men, and deploying them as skirmishers, I made such disposition of the remainder as in my judgment would successfully resist the enemy's farther advance. I then reconnoitered his position, and ascertained that some of his cavalry had gone in the direction of Brandy Station, which fact I communicated to Major-General Stuart, through Captain Worthington, of my staff. Upon further investigation, I learned that several cavalry regiments had taken the road to Sevensburg, via Willis Madden's, and reported the same through Lieutenant Holcombe, from whom I