War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0247 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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feresd much from hunger and fatigue, and as they went into camp at 9 o'clock at night, one man of the Twenty-eight Regiment actually died from exhaustion - an unnecessary hardship, because the troops were on the homeward march, and did not obtain transportation for the next twenty-four hours . The following night the troops were embarked, in a most severe rain-storm, on board of cars for Baltimore, Md., some of the men in open cars, exposed to the storm . The entire next day wa spent in reaching Baltimore, and the whole of the night of the 17th and of the of the 18th were spent in getting to Harrisburg, and many of the men in open cars, exposed to the rain an night air . On sunday, the 19th of July we came from, Harrisburg, and arrived in New York in the afternoon . The command in fifteen days were marched over 100 miles, most of the time in the rain, without proper clothing or shoes for many of the men, with scarcely half the ordinary rations of soldiers, and those irregularly supplied . With little or no covering at night, not even blankets or shelter tents, it is not to be wondered at that many have suffered and that others have died from sickness contracted in this short campaign ; and when the facts shall be fully collected and properly detailed, I am sure that the General Government will be satisfied that if " little or no reliance can be placed upon the paid militia " (vide General Halleck's report), it has at least contributed something toward the safety of the capital of the State of Pennsylvania, and of the great railroads that cross the Susquehanna River at or near that place . The Sixty-eight Regiment New York State National Guard, from Chautauqua County, were with us at the front, and did yeomen's service with axes in leveling a forest around, and marched with us the entire route . There was also another column, consisting of Pennsylvania Militia, under the command of General Dana, that went down the Cumberland Valley Railroad after it was reconstructed in part, and joined the Army of the Potomac near Hagerstown . The officers under my command having been required to make a report of their several regiments directly to the Commander-in-Chief, have, as I am informed, made such report. The Fifty-second and Fifty-sixth having furnished to me copies, which have been printed, I annex. The Twenty-third and Forty-seventh Regiments have not made to me any reports. Too much praise cannot be given to the officers and men of the several regiments of my brigade for the promptness with which they responded to the call of the Commander-in-Chief, and for their endurance of fatigue in their duty, of throwing up embankments, felling forests, and marching through such and extent of country, so poorly as they were supplied with clothing, with camp equipments, and with rations . By the activity and energy of the different members of my staff, the several regiments in our column of march were much assisted, and their wants and suffering greatly alleviated .

Respectfully, yours,

JESSE C. SMITH,

Brig. General Comdg. 11th Brig., New York State national Guard .

Colonel W. I. STEELE, Division Inspector (Ass. Adjt. General), Second Division