War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0246 N. C., Va., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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The next morning (July 4), our column, having been united to the brigades of General Ewen and Crooke, and a bridge of Pennsylvania militia, under command of Colonel Brisbane, with Landis' battery of artillery from Philadelphia, which was now attached to our division, in command of General Knipe -in all about fifteenth regiments of infantry, one battery, and one light battery of artillery -moved out on the Mount holly road, south from Carlisle, and away from all railroad communication . About 12 o'clock it commenced to rain, and continued through the afternoon and night. The road led through the South Mountain, and was very narrow and muddy . The men marched through mud and water, oftentimes kneedeep. The Twenty-third Regiment, having had some of its men nearly drowned while fording a stream, had to stop for the night . The men of the other regiments struggled and straggled through, but when we halted for the night, at 9 o'clock, scarcely a "corporal's guard " was present. The next morning (the 5t of July), without anything to eat, and without waiting for the command to come up, we were marched over the mountains about 5 miles, and encamped ; here we gathered some bread and other eatables from the neighborhood. The next day (the 6th of July) was another rainy day, and night founds us on the road from Gettysburg to Chambersburg, on which the day before the rebels had retreated, without rations, the men sleeping on the west ground in an orchard ; General Knipe and myself and our staffs without anything to eat excepting a little prepared coffee and a peace of bread . Captain Cipperly, additional aide-de-camp, at this time reported to me for duty . The following night, the men having encamped in a piece of wood, found themselves immersed in water in the morning . Our supplies, which were to have come forward, had gone by mistake to Gettysburg . My quartermaster was directed to gather up all loose horses na wagons, and was then sent to Shippensburg from supplies . These did not reach us until after we had arrived at Waynesborough, on the 10th of July . We here (Waynesborough) connected with the Army of the Potomac, and had two or three days of rest . From this place, on the 12th and 13th, we marched to within 1 or 2 miles of Boonsborough, Md. Here w encamped again in the rain, and with scant rations . The next day we advanced on the National road toward Hagerstown, about 2 miles, and as we marched we heard the firing on the Potomac, as Kilpatrick engaged the rebels while crossing . A general engagement was expected, and our force stood in line of battle on the field where Kilpatrick had fought on the Friday proceeding, in readiness, if called upon as a reserve force to the Army of the Potomac, then in front of us . In the afternoon, we were informed that General Lee had recrossed the Potomac River with his whole army . The next morning we were dismissed by General W. F. Smith, and my command, including the Eight and Seventy-first Regiments with Generals Ewen's and Crooke's, were placed in command of General Ewen, and directed to march to Frederick, where we would embark for home . The march to Frederick, on the 15 of the July, was 18 miles over the South Mountain, and without rations . The men, supposing that Frederick was the termination of their day's march, came in to that town in good order ; but when, after dark, the command was ordered by the commanding officer to march to the railroad junction, 3 or 4 miles farther, they became disheartened, and, having no rations served them since the day before, they suf-