War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0073 Chapter XXXIX. The Gettysburg Campaign.

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came to the Shenandoah, 10 miles above the Ferry. In this march Captain William F. Martins and 44 enlisted men fell behind, and have not since been heard from. In Sunday's fight, Private James F. Hodgdon was very seriously wounded by the premature discharge of a cannon, and left in the hospital at Winchester. In the fight at daybreak, Monday, June 15, Private Timothy Sheehan was wounded by a piece of shell in the forehead. Private James Drysdale is reported to have been wounded by a musket -ball at the same time. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. Hanson,

First Lieutenant, Comdg. Company I, 14th Mass. Heavy Artillery.

Adjutant-General Thomas.

No 393.

Report of Lieutenant Edmund D. Spooner, Battery L, Fifth U. S. Artillery, of operations June 13-15.

Maryland Heights, June 26, 1863.

Captain: In compliance with an order from Brigadier-General Elliott, I have the honor to report the following operations of my battery on June 13, 14, and 15, as the commanding officer of the battery was taken prisoner and I being the only officer present: On the morning of the 13th, Lieutenant Randolph received orders to proceed out the Strasburg road with one section of the battery, leaving the remaining two sections of the battery under my command at camp near Winchester, Va. About 10 o'clock the same morning, I received orders from General Elliott to join Lieutenant Randolph with the remainder of the battery on the Strasburg road. After arriving at Union Mills, on the Strasburg road, General Elliott ordered me to take command of one section, and report to Colonel Ely, Eighteenth Connecticut Volunteers, on the Front Royal road. After having reported to Colonel Ely, and observing that our pickets had been driven in on the Front Royal road about 2 miles from town, Colonel Ely ordered me to take position on the right of the Front Royal road and about 1 mile from town, and shell the woods where the enemy was supposed to be, and, after engaging the enemy's cavalry and sharpshooters for about half an hour, a battery of 12-pounder Napoleon guns opened upon me from the right, under cover of woods and at a distance of not more than 400 yards. I then directed my attention to the enemy's guns, but the terrible fire I received from the enemy compelled me to retire, but not until I had succeeded in exploding one of the enemy's caissons. During said engagement, my men acted with great coolness and bravery. After having retired about half way on the Front Royal road leading to the town, a random shell from the enemy's caissons. During said engagement, my men acted with great coolness and bravery. After having retired about half way on the Front Royal road leading to the town, a random shell from the enemy's guns struck one of my limbers, exploding it, and killing 3 cannoneers. I then took position just at the outskirts of the town, under cover of an old orchard, and engaged the enemy at long range. I was then joined by Lieutenant Randolph with the two remaining sections, where we remained during the remainder of the day.