War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0967 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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adjutant-general, and prepared under the direction of the colonel before he left for Washington, to which I can certify as correct.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

J. P. TAYLOR,

Commanding.

Captain H. C. WEIR,

Asst. Adj. General, Third Division, Calvary Corps.

No. 348. Reports of Colonel John B. McIntosh, Third Pennsylvania Cavalry commanding First Brigade, Second Division.

HDQUS. FIRST BRIG., SECOND DIV., CAVALRY CORPS,

Near Warrenton, VA., August 20, 1863.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders received I have the honor to submit the following report of the movements of the First Brigade of this division since the battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863:Late in the afternoon of July 4, I received orders from the division general to report with my brigade to Major-General Pleasonton for orders. In accordance with his orders, I placed my brigade on the extreme left of the army, to picket the different roads and to observe the movements of the enemy in that direction. July 5, I received orders from Major-General Pleasonton move my command at once to Emmitsburg, as some of the enemy's cavalry had gone in that direction, with further instructions that, should the enemy attempt to gain the rear of the army, I must them up to prevent it. In obedience to those orders, I moved my command at once to Emmitsburg, and found that enemy's cavalry, under General Stuart, had gone through there in the morning, moving toward Frederick, I also ascertained that after proceeding on the road to Frederick as far as Graceham, they turned toward Hagerstown. Hearing during the day that the enemy was on the road leading from Emmitsburg to Waynesborough, I proceeded with my command in that direction, and soon met the enemy's picket, which I drove in, capturing a dispatch showing the position of both Generals Longstreet's and Ewell's corps, which I immediately forwarded to Major-General Meade, and a copy of it to Major-General Pleasonton. I then found that, in order to reach the enemy, it became necessary for me to advance in a deep mountain gorge, where it would be impossible to use either cavalry or artillery to advance force of infantry was in my immediate front, caused me to withdraw my command in front commanding the corps. In answer to my dispatch, I received orders to move my brigade in front of Emmitsburg, and feel the enemy on the different roads to Fairfield, Jake's Mountain, and Hagerstown, to ascertain his position, and also to find out if he was on the retreat. I proceeded to carry out these instructions, and had been engaged with the enemy about an hour when I received orders from Major-General Pleasonton to move my command to the Sixth Corps, in front of Fairfield, and report to General Neill for service in following up the enemy from that point, which I promptly complied with.