War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0879

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Page 879
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

shells passed over the train, and three or four fell among the teams, only one exploding. A mule in one of the teams was struck by a solid shot and killed, and many of the animals became so unmanageable that there was danger of a stampede. As soon as the batteries and trains which were moving to the rear had passed, I was directed to move to a field about 1, 000 yards to the rear, and behind a small piece of woods, where I remained until the 5th, when the command moved back to Littlestown, Pa. The amount of issues during our stay at Gettysburg is as follows:

From wagons sent to Major McGilvery and by him supplied to batteries:






Rounds.


From wagons sent to Major McGilvery and by him supplied to batteries:



10-pounder

480


Light 12-pounder

758


3-inch

2,792



4,030





Sent to report to Brigadier-General Hunt, chief of artillery, Army of the Potomac:



Light 12-pounder

360





To batteries, most of which was packed in caissons before leaving the park:



3-inch

8,705


Light 12-pounder

2,144


10-pounder

1,305


20-pounder

320



7,474





To supply train of Second Corps

2,825


To chief of artillery, Third Corps

3,000


To supply train of Eleventh Corps

1,500



7,325


Total issued at Gettysburg

19,189







I had remaining on hand 4, 694 rounds, nearly all of which, though not in the best possible condition, could have been used to advantage had occasion required. In my opinion, the practice of sending wagons loaded with ammunition to batteries in action often causes a loss of material, a number of cases having been reported to me in which, after unloading the wagon and sending it to the rear, the battery has changed its position, leaving the ammunition on the ground.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GILLETT,

Second Lieutenant, and Ordnance Officer, Artillery Reserve.

Captain C. H. WHITTELSEY,

A. A. G., Artillery Reserve.

Numbers 317. Report of Lieutenant Gulian V. Weir, Battery C, Fifth U. S. Artillery, First Regular Brigade.

CAMP OF BATTERY C, FIFTH U. S. ARTILLERY,

September 20, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report the part Battery C, Fifth U. S. Artillery, took during the engagements of July 2 and 3, at the battle of Gettysburg. July 2. - Left camp near Taneytown, Md., and marched to within a mile and a half of Gettysburg, Pa., and went into park. After



Page 879
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.