War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0852 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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as I learned from those who returned, passed through the enemy's lines and been surrounded. The enemy then fired on us from the breastworks on our right, having taken possession of them in our absence. We then formed line of battle at right angles with our breastworks, and lay on our arms all night, with occasional firing from the enemy, wounding 1 man of Company K. At 3 a. m. of the 3d, having observed objects moving in front, Colonel Cobham, Lieutenant-Colonel Zulick, and I met in rear of the center of the brigade to consult, when they opened fire on us, extending entirely across our front, showing them to be in strong force. The fire was returned with spirit by our brigade, and the enemy soon ceased firing, having retreated a short distance behind the crest of the hill. We were then ordered to move back about 50 paces, behind a ledge of rocks. At 3. 30 a. m. the enemy again opened on us from behind trees and rocks and the breastworks on our front, and the fight became general. My regiment, having fired their 60 rounds of ammunition, was relieved by the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and moved to the field to replenish. After an absence of forty-five minutes, I returned, relieved the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and continued the fight. About 10. 30 a. m. the enemy advanced to charge us, Steuart's brigade leading. Our men stood to their ground well, firing with great rapidity and execution. When within 70 paces, their column began to waver, and soon after broke and ran from reach of our fire, leaving a large number of their dead and wounded on the field. The fight was, however, still continued from behind the rocks and trees by the enemy, and our last supply of ammunition having been expended, we were relieved by the First Maryland, Colonel Maulsby, at 11 a. m. The fight had been kept up for seven and three-quarter hours without cessation, during which time the Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers was absent forty-five minutes to replenish their ammunition. My men and officers behaved with great spirit and bravery. The loss of the Twenty-ninth is, as far as known, 70, viz: Captain Johnson, Company B, and 10 men, prisoners; Lieutenant Harvey, Company K, and Lieutenant McKeever, Company A; Serg. Major Charles H. Letford (son of the adjutant), 3 sergeants, 1 corporal, and 8 privates killed, and 45 enlisted men wounded. * We returned to our breastwork at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, and occupied our old position, with considerable annoyance from the sharpshooters. At 9. 30 p. m. the enemy advanced on our lines in force, but they were received with such a heavy fire from our lines that they soon retired. At daybreak on the 4th, a company of the Twenty-ninth was sent out as skirmishers, who soon ascertained that the enemy had left this side of Rock Creek. By order of General Kane, I sent a company to assist in carrying off the arms left on the field by the enemy. I heartily commend the officers and men of my command for their steadiness and bravery. I sincerely deplore the loss of many brave officers and men of my command.

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*But see revised statement, p. 184.

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