War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0847 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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Stuart`s cavalry that I succeeded with great difficulty in making my way through their lines in citizen`s dress. I have to express my thanks to Colonel Cobham, One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, who commanded the brigade in my absence, for the high state of efficiency in which I found it. I have recommended this most deserving officer for promotion. The brigade was ordered forward into line with the rest of the division soon after my arrival, and before sundown threw up a substantial breastwork, as directed, as directed, upon the excellent position assigned them. At twilight we were removed to the batteries on the turnpike, and shortly after ordered to return to our former position. On entering the wood, within 200 paces of our breastwork, we were met by a sharp fire, which we supposed to come from the First Brigade, misled by the darkness. The men were, therefore, ordered not to reply, but withdrawn to the turnpike and marched in by another road. We moved directly to the position of the Third Brigade (where the noble veteran Greene, by his resistance against overwhelming odds, is should be remembered, saved the army), and, making our way past Greene`s right, were again fired upon, thus discovering that the enemy had entire possession of our works. Their front was then opposite Greene`s right flank, he holding them there. There was nothing to be done but to connect with Greene, fold down to the right along the best ground offering, and strengthen the right flank as much as possible. The attack in force upon us commenced at 3. 30 a. m., July 3. The Confederate Major-General Johnson`s division led, followed by Rodes`. The statement by our prisoners is that they advanced in three lines, but they appeared to us only as closed in mass. We ceased firing occasionally for a minute or two, to induce the enemy to come out of advantageous positions, when they paid for their temerity; but with this exception kept up a fire of unintermitting strength for seven hours, until about 10. 30 o`clock, when the enemy made their last determined effort by charging in column of regiments. Their advance was Steuart`s brigade, of Johnson`s division. The First Maryland Battalion (Confederate Stated) left most of their dead in line with our own. It cannot be denied that they behaved courageously. Our own loss was but 23 killed and 73 wounded. Twenty men have been missing since we were on in the woods on Thursday night. After this repulse the enemy fell back, and, although they kept up a desultory fire for some time after, it was plain, as the result proved, that the battle was over. By the accompanying report of Lieutenant W. H. White, * Company G, Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, you will see that the number of Enfield rifles left by the enemy, on an area of about two acres in front of our second position, was 1, 803. The reports of burying parties will probably show that not less than 500 men were left dead there. The whole number of men of my brigade who were in this action was 652. They justified their reputation as marksmen. I have not the name of a single straggler or recreant reported to me. Every officer and man of my command did his duty, and I must on this account refuse myself the privilege of naming particularly any of the numerous examples of heroism which I witnessed.

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* Omitted.

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