War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0809 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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however, with the fire from the regiment in the works, effectually checked all farther advance of the enemy. The men immediately moved forward, and relieved the regiment in the advance, opened their fire, and kept it up until they had expended their ammunition, when they were in turn relieved by the One hundred and fiftieth New York Regiment. In crossing the open space between the hill and the breastworks, we lost 1 man only, though the fire upon us was severe. As soon as we reached the breastworks, the enemy opened upon the five companies above referred to from the flank and from a point not fully protected by our works. There we met with nearly all the casualties which we suffered during the fight; but I am happy to state that our loss has been small for the length of time we were engaged and the severity of the fire received. Fire were killed, 22 wounded, and 7 missing. * The conduct of my men was very satisfactory. All did their duty, and, considering that this was the first time they were under fire, their behavior was very steady. Where all did their duty so well it is impossible to discriminate. We remained upon the field until 8 p. m., when, in obedience to orders, we took up another position, and bivouacked for the night. Thus ended the participation of my command in the glorious achievements of yesterday. From the prisoners taken we have been credibly informed that the enemy we fought was the First Maryland (rebel) Regiment [Battalion].

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

JAS. WALLACE,

Colonel First Regiment Eastern Shore Maryland Vols.

Brigadier General H. H. LOCKWOOD,

Comdg. Second Brig., First Div., Twelfth Army Corps.

Numbers 285. Reports of Colonel John H. Ketcham, One hundred and fiftieth New York

Infantry.

IN CAMP NEAR GETTYSBURG, PA.,

July 4, 1863.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to make the following report of the movements of the One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteer Infantry during the recent battle near Gettysburg: This regiment arrived here about 8 a. m. July 2, and was held in reserve on the right until about 6 p. m., when it was ordered with the First Maryland Potomac Home Brigade Volunteers, Colonel Maulsby, to proceed at once and re-enforce General Sedgwick on the extreme left. Upon reaching the battle-ground, these two regiments were ordered forthwith to the front in double-quick time amid the most terrific firing of shell and musketry. They continued to advance until after they had crossed the line of battle of the enemy, the rebels meanwhile retreating, when the firing ceased. The One hundred and fiftieth Regiment New York Volunteers brought off three pieces of artillery which had been abandoned to the enemy. This regiment then, about 9 p. m., returned to the right, and re-

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* But see revised statement, p. 184.

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