War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0798

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Page 798
N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

at Leesburg. Here we remained for a week, the regiment in the meantime going on picket for three days. At 4 p. m. June 26, started from camp; crossed the Potomac at Edwards Ferry; passed through Poolesville, and bivouacked near the bank of the Monocacy, after a march of about 20 miles. The next day, 27th, crossed the Monocacy, and passed through Point of Rocks; encamped within a mile of Knoxville, Md. June 28, moved at 6 a. m., and, passing through Jefferson, reached Frederick a little after noon. Here it was announced that General Hooker was relieved and General Meade placed in command of the Army of the Potomac. Monday, June 29, left camp, passed through Frederick, and, marching about 18 miles, encamped near Middleburg. June 30, passed through Middleburg and Taneytown, and halted for the night a mile outside of Littlestown, on the Hanover road. While approaching Littlestown, our cavalry was attacked and the infantry ordered to be hurried forward. We accordingly marched through the town at a double-quick, but the rebels had flown. The next morning marched to Two Taverns, and thence toward Gettysburg, where a battle was then raging; formed line near Rock Creek. Lay on our arms that night. Next morning we were ordered in position on the hill near Rock Creek. Afterward were moved toward the town, into the woods to the right of Cemetery Hill. Here the regiment, being in the front line of the brigade, built a strong breastwork along its front. About 4 p. m., in connection with the rest of the brigade, marched to the left of the line, and took position behind the Third Corps. About dark it was ordered back to its old ground. On approaching the woods in which the works were located, Company I was sent out as skirmishers, who soon reported the rebels in the works. First Lieutenant Marcus Beadle was taken prisoner at this time. The regiment was then moved a little farther back, and a number of shots were fired from the woods into its ranks, killing 1 man. It lay on its arms until morning, when a battery was planted in its rear to shell the woods in front. One man was killed and 1 wounded by the bursting of the shells of this battery in our ranks. The regiment lay in this position as a reserve until about 2 p. m., when, the enemy having been driven from the breastworks, it moved forward and occupied them. About 4 p. m. it was ordered to march out to the left. After marching some distance, and before co ming in a line, the order was countermanded, and the regiment returned to the breastworks, where it lay until morning, when, in connection with two other regiments and a battery, it made a reconnaissance to the north and east of the town as far as the railroad. Found the enemy had fallen back. Returned through the town to the works again. I regret to state that Captain Weer, a brave and accomplished officer, was severely wounded on Friday by a rebel sharpshooter. The casualties in the regiment were as follows:




Officers and men.

Killed.

Wounded.

Missing.

Total


Officers.

....

1

1

2


Enlisted men

3

8


11


Total(*)

3

9

1

13

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*But see revised statement, p. 184.

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Page 798
N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.