War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0597

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Page 597
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.




Napoleon gun (captured by Third Division)

1











Caissons captured by ---







First Division

4






Third Division

2







6






Limber (captured by Third Division)

1






Accouterments (captured by First Division) sets.

100






Gun, caissons, and limber recaptured from the enemy.






I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. SYKES,

Major-General,

Commanding.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac.

Numbers 188. Report of Captain James A. Bates, Chief Ambulance Officer.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH CORPS,

August 27, 1863.

DOCTOR: I have the honor to report the part taken by the ambulances of Fifth Corps during the fight at Gettysburg. The corps went into action about 4 p. m. July 2, accompanied by the stretcher-bearers. The ambulances were brought in rear of the corps, and as near as was thought safe, to which place the wounded were carried by the stretcher-bearers, then transported by the ambulances to the hospital, a distance of about 1 mile from the scene of action. As soon as it grew dark, the ambulances drove on to the battle-field, picking up the wounded. The ambulances kept constantly running from the hospital to the battle-field until 4 a. m. July 3, when it was found that all the wounded had been removed excepting about 6, who were beyond our pickets, in which case we were unable to get them. I will here state that some of the attendants in charge of Lieutenant Clay, Second Division, went beyond the pickets to remove a wounded man. When in the act of removing him, they were fired on by the enemy's pickets. The number of wounded transported by eighty-one ambulances from 4 p. m. July 2 to 4 a. m. July 3 was 1, 300. Great praise is due both officers and men for their promptness in removing the wounded. The number of casualties in the ambulance corps was 1 man severely wounded in the arm. About 10 a. m. July 3, orders were received from the medical director to remove the wounded 1 mile farther to the rear, as the enemy had commenced to shell the hospital. In consequence of having to remove the wounded a second time, the eighty-one ambulances transported 2, 600 wounded men a distance of 1 1/2 miles in forty-eight hours. I will here state that the horses were in a very poor condition, having been constantly on the march for three weeks. While at Gettysburg, they had to live on half rations.



Page 597
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.