War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0566 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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of battle, the left of our regiment, which formed the extreme left of the brigade, resting on a cross-road, the line running parallel with the main road and in rear of the peach orchard. We remained in line of battle about two hours, under a most terrific fire of shot and shell, when we were pressed so hard on the left flank that we were obliged to fall back. This we did in as good order as the circumstances would permit. At this time I was wounded in the arm and side, and a few minutes after had my horse killed. I was now obliged to give up the command to Lieutenant-Colonel Leonard, who fought the regiment after I left. He and the rest of the officers were indefatigable in their exertions to rally the men, who were still hard pressed and obliged to fall slowly back to the crest of the hill from which the brigade started in the morning, where they rallied, and, charging across the field, retook their guns and one battle-flag belonging to the Eighth Florida Regiment, together with a large number of prisoners, all of which they brought from the field. It was now dark, and the remnants of the regiment were collected together, and bivouacked for the night in an orchard near the Gettysburg road. The next morning the regiment was marched back to the rear, for the purpose of obtaining ammunition and rations for the men. At 2 p. m. they were again moved to the front, to support a battery, where the regiment remained until 7 p. m., when it returned to the position that they occupied in the morning. On the morning of the 5th, they were again moved forward, and took up a position in the second line of battle. In about two hours the regiment was marched back into a field and encamped. On the morning of the 6th, it was found that the enemy had retreated, and we were at once ordered to march. We did not move over half a mile, and then returned to the same camp. It would be doing an act of injustice to the brave men of the Third if I did not speak more at length in regard to their conduct on that memorable and ever-to-be-remembered July 2. It would also seem like an injustice to speak of one as having done better or performed his duty more nobly than another; still, I cannot pass by in silence the manner in which Lieutenant-Colonel Leonard and Major Abell performed their duties upon that occasion; also Captain Bailey and Lieutenant William McConnell. Among the men it is hard to particularize, but I think that our color corporal, Edwin H. Tarry, deserves particular mention. He was ever to the front, and carried the flag through that storm of shot and shell with credit to the regiment and honor to himself. Our loss was very severe. We took 22 officers and 283 men into the fight, and had 8 officers wounded, 1 of whom has since died, 7 men killed, 86 wounded, and 15 missing. *On the 7th, the regiment marched to Mechanicstown, and encamped for the night. Left camp on the morning of the 8th, at 6 a. m., and marched about 1 mile beyond Frederick, where it bivouacked for the night at 10 p. m. On the 9th, it marched to Middletown, where it received rations for the first time in two days, and encamped for the night on the battle-field of South Mountain.

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*But see revised statement, p. 178

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