War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0559

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Page 559
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

and twentieth New York Volunteers, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel C. D. Westbrook, in support of the first line of battle of our division. At about 4 o'clock we advanced our line of battle, and in our new position were exposed to a most terrible fire from the enemy's artillery on our left, which was most destructive, killing and wounding many men. At about 5. 30 o'clock, the Fourth Excelsior, commanded by Major M. W. Burns, having been relieved from its first position on the crest of the hill, I was directed to send it to the support of General Graham's brigade, in the First Division. They advanced to this duty most gallantly. Up to this time we had not been engaged at all, but now the troops on our left being obliged to fall back, the enemy advanced upon us in great force, pouring into us a most terrific fire of artillery and musketry, both upon our front and left flank. Our men returned it with great effect, and for some time held the enemy in check, both the troops on our left being, for want of support, forced still farther back, left us exposed to an enfilading fire, before which we were obliged to fall back, which was done in good order, but with terrible loss of both officers and men. Seeing the enemy in possession of three of our guns, I made a charge at the head of about 150 men, from the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, and One hundred and twentieth Regiments, and succeeded in recapturing them, taking from one the colors of the Eighth Florida Regiment, and bringing in as prisoners the major of that regiment and some 30 of his men. The colors were taken by Sergt. Thomas Hogan, Third Excelsior, who by his bravery attracted the personal attention of the general commanding the division. Soon after sunset relieved by a brigade from the Second Corps, in the rear of which we reformed our line of battle, and bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the 3d, we moved a little distance to the rear, to give the men rations and refill their cartridge-boxes. At about 3 p. m. we again moved to the front, in support of batteries. While here, we were exposed to a very severe artillery fire, and lost quite a number of men. At sunset, we returned to the position occupied in the morning, and bivouacked for the night. On the 4th, 5th, and 6th, nothing was done beyond sending out parties to bury the dead. On the morning of the 7th, we started in pursuit of the retreating enemy. Our losses in the battle of Gettysburg were as follows:

K Killed. M Missing.

W Wounded. T Total.






Officers.

Enlisted men.







Command.

K

W

K

W

M

T



Brigade staff

....

2

....

....

....

2



1st Excelsior

....

8

20

85

4

117



2d Excelsior

1

6

9

62

13

91



3d Excelsior

....

7

7

72

28

114



4th Excelsior

4

11

47

92

8

162



5th Excelsior

....

6

12

68

3

89



120th New York

7

10

23

144

19

203



Total

12

50

118

523

75

778




Page 559
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.