War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0538 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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a copse, where the division bivouacked in line of battle near Jones' Cross-Roads. July 14. -Left the bivouac last mentioned at 5. 30 a. m., with orders from corps headquarters to advance on the Williamsport turnpike, and occupy the position vacated by the First Division, Twelfth Corps, which advanced to reconnoiter the enemy. Occupied this position till 11. 20 a. m. Marched at that hour toward Williamsport, crossing Marsh Run, passing through the enemy's evacuated works, which covered their approaches with artillery and infantry fire, and bivouacked at 3. 20 p. m. on the pike, 4 miles, as was said, from Williamsport.

July 15. -Left bivouac at 6 a. m. Marched through Fair Play, Tilghmanton, and Sharpsburg, crossing the battle-field of Antietam, which was marked by the trees being battered, without exception, on the side facing us, we going southward. Crossed the Antietam on a stone bridge, and bivouacked half a mile from it, on top of the hill, at 1. 30 p. m.

July 16. - Left bivouac at 6 a. m. Passed through Rohrersville, by mistake of the guide, and Brownsville. Bivouacked at the forks of road, 4 miles from Haprsr's Ferry.

July 17. -Left bivouac at 4. 30 p. m. Crossed the Potomac at Harper's Ferry on a pontoon bridge. Crossed the Shenandoah, and bivouacked on Sweet Run, 3 miles from Harper's Ferry, at 7. 15 p. m.

July 18. -Marched at 4 a. m. up Sweet Run to Hillsborough, and bivouacked west of the town. The advance guard passed through the town, as I had been informed some of the enemy were there.

July 19. -Marched at 7. 45 a. m. Passed near Woodgrove, and bivouacked 1 mile west of the town, on the right of the pike, facing Ashby's Gap. The division was re-enforced in this position by Batter B, First New Jersey Artillery, commanded by Lieutenant Robert Sims.

July 22. -Left Bivouac near Ashby's Gap at 3. 15 p. m., and bivouacked at Piedmont Station, on the Manassas Railroad, at 6. 50 p. m. The account of the 23d, 24th, and 25th is detailed in the following report rendered to headquarters Third Corps on

July 29:

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, THIRD CORPS,

Camp near Warrenton, Va.,

July 29, 1863.

CAPTAIN: Pursuant to your circular, I have the honor to report the operations of this division during July 23, 24, and 25: The division marched from its bivouac at Piedmont early on the morning of the 23rd instant, following the road into Manassas Gap. At Linden we came up with the First Division of the corps, and I then formed the three brigades in three columns in mass, and was ordered in this manner to follow and support the First Division, which was deployed to the front. This was done, by orders from headquarter of the corps, until the First Division had carried the high ridge crossing our course, upon which the enemy first made fight. this was a very high and steep ridge, and being cleared, the whole mechanism of the advance was visible, furnishing a magnificent scene. When my columns arrived at the top, I found the line of the First Division deployed along the crest, occupying it far to the right and left. Its skirmishers, advanced below on the other side, were stationary, and warmly engaged with those of the enemy, both parties seeking the cover of the ground from each other, but perfectly in view from the top of the ridge. At this juncture I received permission from corps headquarters to employ my Division where I saw best. I the directed Brigadier-General Spinola to march his brigade (the Excelsior) by the flank along the hollow, then in our view, winding to the front and center of the high ridge on which we stood, keeping on the lowest ground within it, and on debouching from it by the left flank, to advance in line by his proper front up the hill he would find himself at the base of, and take it. This hill was the key of the ground occupied by the enemy's skirmishers. The First and Third Brigades were already in position to support this charge by advancing down the counter-fort of the main ridge, a nearer route to the hill referred to.