War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0484 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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gade of fresh troops, and, at his request, I assigned them a position. My division was relieved from the front line by the Second and Fifth Corps toward dusk. The annexed tables of casualties show the nature of the engagement and its terrific character. * Several of my regiments lost more than 50 per cent. of their number and almost every officer engaged. One regiment, the One hundred and forty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Madill, lost, out of 200 taken into the fight, 149 men and officers killed and wounded. Accompanying this report I send those of the brigade and regimental commanders, which give in detail the movements of their commands. Every regiment of my command did its whole duty, and officers vied with each other in honorable emulation to repel the masses that were hurled on my small division for three hours. The batteries were well handled, and I have no report of any guns being lost, as, in retiring, we hauled the disabled pieces from the field. The First Brigade, composed of Pennsylvania regiments, commanded by Brig. General C. K. Graham, tried with its skeleton ranks to even outdo Chancellorsville. General Graham was wounded and fell into the hands of the enemy, with Lieutenant-Colonel Cavada, of the One hundred and fourteen Pennsylvania Volunteers, and Major Neeper, of the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers. The Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Sides; Sixty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Danks; Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Tippin; One hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Craig; One hundred and fourteen Pennsylvania Volunteers, Lieutenant Colonel Cavada, and the One hundred and forty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Madill, composed this brigade, and have made its reputation equal to any in this army. General Graham showed the same coolness, daring, and endurance under the terrible fire that distinguished him at Chancellorsville. The Second Brigade, Brigadier-General Ward, held also a post of great honor and importance, and fully sustained its old reputation. The First U. S. Sharpshooters, Colonel Berdan, and Second U. S. Sharpshooters, Major Stoughton; Third Maine, Colonel Lakeman; Fourth Maine, Colonel Walker; Twentieth Indiana, Colonel Wheeler; Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania, Major Moore; One hundred and twenty-fourth New York, Colonel Ellis, and Eighty-sixth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel Higgins, composed this brigade. Colonel Walker, who had so distinguished himself on the Peninsula and at Manassas, Chantilly, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, was seriously wounded; and those gallant officers, Colonels Ellis and Wheeler, fell, dead, with their crowns to the foe, at the head of their regiments. I am indebted to Brigadier-General Ward for his cordial co-operation. The Third Brigade, Colonel De Trobriand commanding, held the center of my line. The Fortieth New York, Colonel T. W. Egan; Third Michigan, Colonel Pierce; Fifth Michigan, Lieutenant Colonel Pulford; Seventeenth Maine, Lieutenant-Colonel Merrill; and One hundred and tenth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant Colonel D. M. Jones, composed this brigade. Colonel De trobriand deserves my heartiest thanks for his skillful disposition of his command by gallantly holding his advanced position until relieved by other troops. This officer is one of the oldest

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*Embodied in revised statement, p. 177.

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