War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0478 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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pany I, First U. S. Artillery, First Lieutenant George A. Woodruff commanding; Battery A, Fourth U. S. Artillery, First Lieutenant A. H. Cushing commanding; Battery A, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, Captain W. A. Arnold commanding; Battery B, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, First Lieutenant T. Frederick Brown commanding; Battery B, First New York Artillery, Captain J. M. Rorty commanding-moved from Uniontown, Md., to Taneytown, where a halt of three hours was made. At 2 p. m. the brigade moved toward Gettysburg, Pa., to the support of the First Corps, then engaged with the enemy, and at 11 p. m. went into position 3 miles southeast of Gettysburg, on the Taneytown road and facing Gettysburg. The brigade moved with the corps at daylight on July 2 toward Gettysburg, and, upon the establishment of the battle-line of the corps to the left of the Taneytown road, took position in the following order, as shown in the diagram: On the right, in a grove, Light Company I [six light 12-pounders]; 150 yards to the left, Battery A, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, and Battery A, Fourth U. S. Artillery [both six 3-inch batteries]. Upon their left was placed Battery B, First Rhode Island Light Artillery [six light 12-pounders], while to the extreme left, and operating with the First Division of the corps, was placed Battery B, First New York Artillery [four 10-pounder Parrotts]. At 11 a. m. the enemy was seen in force in the woods to the front and right, and shell and case shot were fired till their disappearance. The enemy opened with artillery several times during the day, but was always silenced by the concentrated fire of our own artillery. About 4 p. m. the Third Corps advanced to the Emmitsburg road, and, upon being repulsed, our lines were opened upon by the enemy with artillery. A vigorous fire was returned. At 6 p. m. the enemy advanced in force, and, after a sharp contest, our lines were pushed back several hundred yards, the two batteries on the left-Battery B, First New York Artillery, m and Battery B, First Rhode Island Light Artillery-conforming their movement to that of the infantry. Upon gaining a more commanding position upon the crest of the hill, a rapid fire was opened upon the enemy, causing

great slaughter, and steadily driving them back. The two batteries on the left, being at the main point of attack on the left and center of the line, suffered most severely. Battery B, First New York Artillery, lost 1 man killed, 8 men wounded, and 13 horses disabled. Battery B, First Rhode Island Light Artillery, lost 1 man killed, 7 men wounded, and 2 missing. This battery was exposed to a most severe infantry fire; 24 horses were killed and 6 disabled, and it became necessary to send two guns to the rear. First Lieutenant T. Fred. Brown was severely wounded in the neck by a musket-shot while gallantly commanding the battery, and the command devolved upon First Lieutenant W. S. Perrin. First Lieutenant Samuel Canby, Battery A, Fourth U. S. Artillery, was severely wounded in the hand. The morning of July 3 was quiet until about 8 o'clock, when the enemy suddenly opened fire upon our position, exploding three limbers of Battery A, Fourth U. S. Artillery, but otherwise causing little loss. Little reply was mad, save by Light Company I, First U. S. Artillery, which battery during the forenoon had eight separate engagements with the enemy. At 1 p. m. the artillery of the enemy opened along the whole line,