War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0407

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Page 407
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

July 1, marched from Uniontown, passing through Taneytown, beyond which we made a halt, and were making arrangements to encamp when we were ordered to march. At evening we halted about 3 miles from Gettysburg, and were ordered to build breastworks. Before the works were finished, we were ordered to rest. At 2. 30 a. m., July 2, we were ordered to pack up quietly and cook coffee. At 4. 10 a. m., we moved about 1 mile to the front, and at 5. 45 a. m. halted in a wood. At 6. 10 a. m. we marched with the brigade out of the wood across the Taneytown road. At 7 a. m. were formed with the brigade in line, by brigade in mass, fronting west, in a position a half mile southwest of Cemetery Hill. At 5. 15 p. m. we moved in mass by brigade nearly a mile to the left. The regiment was deployed into line, faced by the rear rank, on the right of the Fifty-third Pennsylvania Regiment, the left of the Second Delaware resting on our right. The regiment advanced with the brigade rapidly and steadily under a sharp fire from the enemy, whom we drove before us, killing, wounding, and taking many prisoners. The regiment went into the engagement numbering 202 enlisted men carrying rifles, 2 field, 1 staff, and 16 line officers. Our loss this day was as follows:




Officers and men.

Killed.

Wounded.

Missing.

Total


Commissioned officers.

4

7

....

11


Enlisted men

11

54

18

83


Total

15

61

18

94







The service lost in the killed the brave Captain Henry V. Fuller, who had distinguished himself for gallantly in every action in which the regiment had been engaged. He was so well known in his brigade and division as to make it unnecessary for me to say anything in his praise. Captain A. H. Lewis and Lieutenants Babcock and Thurber, who fell at the same time, were highly esteemed as officers and gentlemen. They died facing the foe. On the morning of the 3d, the Sixty-fourth was in line on the left of the brigade, and mustered for action l field officer, 5 captains, 6 lieutenants, and 85 enlisted men with rifles. Colonel Bingham being wounded and at the division hospital, the command of the regiment devolved upon Major Bradley. Breastworks were built to our front, which proved a protection against the heavy cannonading from the enemy on that day. Our loss on the 3rd was 1 man, wounded on picket, under the command of Captain W. W. Wait. I am happy to say, so far as came to my knowledge, that during the two days engagement every officer and enlisted man did his duty in such a manner as to honor himself, his regiment, his brigade and his country. On the 4th we buried our dead and held short religious services, conducted by Chaplain John H. W. Stuckenberg, of the One hundred and forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers. Afterward I sent out a detail to collect arms and accouterments on the battle-field.



Page 407
Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.