War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0375 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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I have no doubt the service was promptly performed. Just in time to increase the panic of the fleeing fugitives, Battery K, Fifth U. S. Artillery, Lieutenant Kinzie commanding, and Fitzhugh's New York battery arrived, and opened on them. the enemy's attack was feebly renewed immediately after his first repulse. A single line of battle, with its left running nearly along the line followed by the right of the preceding lines, and numbering about 3, 000 men, advanced, but it was utterly broken by the fire of the batteries on my left before it arrived within musketry range. A large number of the enemy came in and gave themselves up as soon as their line was broken, and 2 stand of colors fell into our hands. This great victory was not gained without irreparable losses. In addition to those previously mentioned, the following regimental commanders were killed: Colonel Dennis O'Kane, Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers; Lieutenant Colonel Max A. Thoman, Fifty-ninth New York Volunteers; Colonel Richard P, Roberts, One hundred and fortieth Pennsylvania Volunteers (on the 2d); Colonel P. J. Revere, Twentieth Massachusetts Volunteers, and Lieutenant-Colonel Steele, Seventh Michigan Volunteers. The number of casualties among the field officers was very great, many of the regiments losing them all. Toward the close of the main contest, I had the misfortune to lose the valuable services of a distinguished officer, Brigadier General John Gibbon, commanding Second Division, who was severely wounded. A short time afterward I was myself wounded, but was enabled to remain on the field until the action was entirely over, when I transferred the command to Brigadier-General Caldwell. The services of the artillery during this engagement are particularly spoken of in the report of the commander of the artillery. Its losses in officers, men, and material will sufficiently attest the severity of the ordeal to which it was subjected, Three of the battery commanders, Captain Rorty and Lieutenants A. H. Cushing and G. A. Woodruff, all able, experienced, and distinguished officers, were killed, and another battery commander, Lieutenant T. F. Brown, First Rhode Island Artillery, severely wounded. The losses of the corps during the action at Gettysburg amounted to 4, 323 officers and mend killed, wounded and missing. The strength of the corps in the action was about 10, 000 officers and men. A statement of the losses in detail is herewith inclosed. * To speak of the conduct of the troops would seem to be unnecessary, but still it may be justly remarked that this corps sustained its well-earned reputation on many fields, and that the boast of its gallant first commander, the late Major General E. V. Sumner, that the Second Corps had" never given to the enemy a gun or color, " holds good now as it did under the command of my predecessor, Major-General Couch. To attest to its good conduct and the perils through which it has passed, it may be stated that its losses in battle have been greater than those of any other corps in the Army of the Potomac, or probably in the service, notwithstanding its has usually been numerically weakest. Fort the services of the commanders of divisions, Brig. Gens. John Gibbon, Alexander hays, and John C. Caldwell, I need only to refer to the history of the deeds of their commands. Brigadier Generals John Gibbon and Alexander Hays, being more particularly under my eye in the crisis of the battle, it is but just that I

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*Embodied in revised statement. pp. 175-177

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