War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0335 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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through fields and up a gentle ascent toward the enemy. Attaining the crest of the hill or slope, a line was formed to the right and somewhat in advance of the First Brigade, with the One hundred and fiftieth Regiment on the left, the One hundred and forty-third in the center, and the One hundred and forty-ninth upon the right. The One hundred and fiftieth and One hundred and forty-third occupied the interval between a grove of woods on the left (in or near which General Reynolds was killed) and a barn and stone dwelling on the right, while the One hundred and forty-ninth was formed on an extension of the line to the right of the barn and between it and the railroad cut. The troops occupied this position for a short time under a fire of round shot and shell, when the enemy's advance, preceded by skirmishers, was discovered, and at the same time an artillery fire was opened on our right, enfilading our line. Company B, of the One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Captain G. W. Jones; Company A, of the One hundred and forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Captain C. M. Conyngham, and Company K, of the One hundred and forty-ninth, under Captain John C. Johnson, were deployed to the front as skirmishers, and soon after became warmly engaged. Later in the day, Company E, of the One hundred and forty-ninth, under Captain Z. C. McCulloch, was detached for like duty, and these four companies, under their gallant officers, were employed in this service during the early part of the engagement, and until forced back by overwhelming numbers upon the main line. The attack upon our right became so severe that a partial change of front was necessary, and the One hundred and forty-third and One hundred and forty-ninth Regiments, under a severe fire, were line, along a road which runs parallel with and distant about 100 yards from the railroad cut. The One hundred and forty-third Regiment took position to the right of the One hundred and forty-ninth, while the One hundred and fiftieth retained its original position, being merely deployed to occupy the space between the grove and barn, and fill up the interval exposed by the removal of the One hundred and forty-third to its new position. This movement had scarcely been completed when the enemy advanced against our entire front in large numbers, and, when within easy range, were received with an effective fire from our whole line, which threw them into confusion, and a charge by the One hundred and forty-ninth forward to the railroad cut being made, they fell back to a sheltered position, where they were re-enforced and their broken ranks reformed. At about this point in the action, Colonels Stone, of the One hundred and forty-ninth, and Wister, of the One hundred and fiftieth, having been wounded, I took command of the brigade. The contest soon became severe and close. Three successive assaults upon our line were, repulsed, in which we sustained heavy losses in killed and wounded, but the enemy evidently, from the numbers left upon the ground at each repulse, suffered still more severely. The brigade went into position at about 11 a. m., became engaged about noon. The conflict had continued until about 4 p. m., when a more heavy advance by the enemy was made and again checked by a well-directed fire, but the support both upon our right and left having been withdrawn, his superior numbers enabled the enemy to extend his lines, so as to threaten both our flanks and rear. In addition to Colonels Stone and Wister, Lieutenant-Colonel