War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0255 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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and Lieutenant Charles P. Hyatt, of Company B, and Lieutenant Goltermann, of Company F, were also among the highly distinguished. The commander of the regiment, Lieutenant Colonel R. R. Dawes, proved himself to be one of the ablest officers on the field.

General Robinson, commanding the Second Division, thus commends the officers and men of his command:

The instances of distinguished gallantry are too numerous to be embodied in these report, and I leave it to the brigade and regimental commanders to do justice to those under their immediate commands. When all did so well it is difficult to discriminate. As, however, they came under my personal observation, I cheerfully indorse the remarks of General Baxter in commendation of Colonel Coulter, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; Colonel Wheelock, Ninety-seventh New York; Colonel Lyle, Ninetieth Pennsylvania; Colonel Bates and Lieutenant-Colonel Allen, Twelfth Massachusetts; Lieutenant-Colonel Moesch, Eighty-third New York, and Major Foust, Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania. After the fall of General Paul, the command of the First Brigade devolved successively upon Colonel Leonard, Thirteenth Massachusetts, Colonel Root, Ninety-fourth New York, and Colonel Coulter, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; Colonel Wheelock, Ninety-seventh New York; Colonel Lyle, Ninetieth Pennsylvania; Colonel Bates and Lieutenant-Colonel Allen, Twelfth Massachusetts; Lieutenant-Colonel Moesch, Eighty-third New York, and Major Foust, Eighty-eight Pennsylvania. After the fall of General Paul, the command of the First Brigade devolved successively upon Colonel Leonard, Thirteenth Massachusetts, Colonel Root, Ninety-fourth New York, and Colonel Coulter, Eleventh Pennsylvania, all of whom were wounded while exercising command. My thanks Pennsylvania, all of whom were wounded while exercising command. My thanks are due to Brigadier-Generals Paul and Baxter for the able and zealous manner in which they handled their brigades. The officers of my staff were actively engaged during the whole of the three days' engagements. Lieutenant Morgan, acting assistant adjutant-general, Lieutenant Hallock, aide-de-camp, and Lieutenants Bratton and Mead, acting aides, were at all times distinguished for their gallantry and good conduct. Captain Havey, acting assistant inspector-general, was wounded and taken from the field early in the day. Lieutenant Smith, ordnance officer, was diligent in the performance of his duty. It affords me pleasure to call special attention to the gallant conduct of one of my orderlies, Sergt. Ebenezer S. Johnson, First a Maine Cavalry, whose chevrons should be exchanged for the appellate. When we make officers of such men, the soldier receives his true reward and the service great benefit.

General Rowley, commanding the Third Division, says: I take pleasure in calling to the notice of the commanding general, Colonel Chapman Biddle, commanding the First Brigade, and Colonel Dana, commanding the Second Brigade, and also the following officers, recommended by brigade commanders: Colonel Gates, Twentieth New York State Militia; Lieutenant-Colonel McFarland, One hundred and fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers (severely wounded); Lieutenant-Colonel McCalmont and Major Biddle, One hundred and forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers; Major Musser, One hundred and forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers; Lieutenant-Colonel Dwight and Captains Irvin and Glenn, One hundred Huidekoper, Major Chamberlain, and Adjutant Ashurst, One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as being distinguished for bravery. The members of the brigade staff are like wise favorably noticed. I would also call to the notice of the commanding general, Lieutenant William L. Wilson (slightly wounded), acting assistant and Lieutenant Moore, One hundred and forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, aided-camp-all acting on my staff July 1-for gallant conduct. The death of Colonel Cummins, One hundred and forty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, a brave and efficient officer, has occasioned feelings of regret throughout the command.

My thanks are specially due to a citizen of Gettysburg named John Burns, who, although over seventy years of age, shouldered his musket, and offered his services to Colonel Wister, One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers. Colonel Wister advised him to join our line of skirmishers in the open fields. When the troops retired, he fought with the Iron Brigade. He was wounded in three places. Private Dennis Buckley, of Company H, Sixth Michigan Cavalry, having had his horse shot under him, also joined the One hundred and fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and fought throughout the day. Shortly after he came up, a shell from a rebel battery exploded in the midst of Company C, killing 2 men and dangerously