War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0136 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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have crept in; but this may possibly stimulate others to come forward with a rectification. Had General Meade been more copious in his report and less reserved as to his own important acts, the necessity for this communication would not have existed.

HISTORICUS.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 18, 1864.

Brig. General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose, for the information of the major-general commanding, a copy of my letter to Senator Wade, chairman of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, expressing my willingness for Major-General Meade to be furnished my testimony before said committee; also a copy of Senator Wade's reply to the same.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. PLEASONTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 11, 1864.

Honorable B. F. WADE,

Chairman of the Committee on the Conduct of the War:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose a copy of a communication received yesterday from Major General George G. Meade, commanding the Army of the Potomac; also a copy of my answer to the same. I desire to state that, should the Committee on the Conduct of the War consider it proper, I am willing Major-General Meade be furnished a succinct statement of my testimony before it.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. PLEASONTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

March 15, 1864.

Major General A. PLEASONTON,

Army of the Potomac:

SIR: Your communication, inclosing copy of one from General Meade to yourself in relation to your testimony before the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, has been received. The committee for more than three years past have acted, and continue to act, upon the rule that the testimony taken by them shall be made known to no one until such time as they shall authorize it to be done. So careful have they been in this respect, that they have usually requested of their witnesses to inform no one of the character of their testimony. They have not done so this session, supposing that their desire was sufficiently well understood to render it unnecessary. In one instance only has any witness been permitted to see and examine the testimony before the committee themselves made it public. General Charles P. Stone made application to the committee, not to the witnesses themselves, for permission to examine the testimony in relation to his administration, basing his application upon the