War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0128 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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such manifest proofs that it was written either by some one present at he battle, or dictated by some one present, and having access not only to official documents but to confidential papers that were never issued to the army, much less made public. I cannot resist the belief that this letter was either written or dictated by Major General D. E. Sickles. An issue has been raised between that officer and myself in regard to the judgment displayed by him in the position he took with his corps at Gettysburg. In my official report I deemed it proper to state that this position was a false and untenable one, but I did General Sickles the justice to express the opinion that, although he had committed an error of judgment, it was done through a misapprehension of orders, and not from any intention to act contrary to my wishes. The prominence given to General Sickles' operations in the inclosed communication, the labored argument to prove his good judgment and my failing, all lead me to the conclusion he is directly or indirectly the author. As the communication contains so many statements prejudicial to my reputation, I feel called upon to ask the interposition of the Department, as I desire to consider the questions raised purely official. I have to ask, therefore, that the department will take steps to ascertain whether Major-General Sickles has authorized or indorse this communication, and, in the event of his replying in the affirmative, I have to request of the President of the United States a court of inquiry, that the whole subject may be thoroughly investigated and the truth mad known. Should this course not be deemed advisable, any other action the Department decline any action, the I desire authority to make use of and publish such official documents as in my judgment are necessary for my defense. Very respectfully,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG -IMPORTANT COMMUNICATION FROM AN EYE

WITNESS - HOW THE VICTORY WAS WON AND HOW ITS ADVANTAGES WERE LOST-GENERALS HALLECK'S AND MEADE'S OFFICIAL REPORTS REFUTED, ETC.

To the Editor of the Herald:

The battle of Gettysburg is the decisive battle of this war. It not only saved the North from invasion, but turned the tide of victory in our favor. The opinion of Europe on the failure of the rebellion dates from this great conflict. How essential, then, that its real history should be known. Up to this moment no clear narrative has appeared. The sketches of the press, the reports of Generals Halleck and Meade, and the oration of Mr. Everett, give only phases of this terrible struggle, and that not very correctly. To supply this hiatus, I send you a connected, and, I hope, lucid review of its main features. I have not ventured to touch on the thrilling incidents and affecting details of such a strife, but have confined myself to a succinct relation of its principal events and the actors therein. My only motive is to vindicate history, do honor to the fallen, and justice to the survivors when unfairly impeached. General Meade took command of the Army of the Potomac on