War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0101 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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WASHINGTON, D. C.,

July 26, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,

Warrenton, Va:

It is impossible to promote General Warren at present. There is no vacancy. I have recommended the discharge of certain useless major-generals, but it has not been acted on. The delay in sending back detachments of cavalry results from want of horse equipments, all on hand having been sent to your army and to General Couch. Others are expected daily.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 26, 1863-8 p. m. {Received 8. 30 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

How far from Alexandria can the troops from Washington guard the Orange and Alexandria Railroad? I ask, that I may direct my troops to connect with them. Do you desire or expect I should take any steps for the reoccupation of the Shenandoah Valley, now abandoned by the enemy? GEO. G. MEADE, Major-General. WASHINGTON, D. C., July 27, 1863. Major-General MEADE, Army of the Potomac: I see no advantage in the reoccupation of the Shenandoah Valley. Lee's army is the objective point. General Heintzelman will reply in regard to his guarding the railroad.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

July 27, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,

Warrenton, Va.:

General Heintzelman says that with his present force he cannot guard the road beyond Manassas Junction.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Warrenton, July 27, 1863. {Received 12. 15 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

From Warrenton Junction it is reported that artillery firing is heard in the direction. Have any been sent from Washington?

GEO. G. MEADE

Major-General.