War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0095 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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cavalry from Harper's Ferry to Williamsport. General [D. McM.] Gregg overtook and engaged the enemy's cavalry near Charlestown this morning, taking 100 prisoners. He informs me that the enemy's infantry are moving to Winchester.

GEO. G. MEADE

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 16, 1863-10 p. m.

(Received 11. 30 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The army id concentrated at this place and Harper's Ferry, and are supplying themselves as rapidly as possible with subsistence stores, forage, and certain indispensable articles of clothing. One bridge is completed at Harper's Ferry, and one will be completed at this point by 8 a. m. to-morrow. I shall immediately cross a division of cavalry to push forward and occupy the nearest gaps to Snicker's Gap. The infantry corps will be moved as soon as their commanders report them ready. I shall push the army forward as rapidly as possible to Warrenton and beyond to Culpeper. I deem it proper, however to advise you that the army is greatly exhausted by previous service, both men and animals, particularly the latter. My cavalry force, from the casualties of battle and the fatigue of service, is greatly reduced. The number of men is reported below 10, 000; the number of horses below 7, 000; of these many barely able to get along. General Pleasonton reports that a considerable number of his officers and men sent to Washington to be remounted have never returned, and that a large number sent to Frederick for the same purpose have not been able to procure horses. It is of the greatest importance that the cavalry should be placed in an efficient condition, as it is only by their prompt movements that I can obtain reliable information of the position of the enemy, and it is only by them I can guard my trains and rear. I beg leave, therefore, to urge that every exertion may be made to procure horses to remount the dismounted men and meet future contingencies.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 16, 1863.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE ARMY,

Washington:

SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit three battle-flags, captured from the enemy by Brigadier-General Kilpatrick's division of cavalry. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.