War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0093 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 14, 1863-2. 30 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

Should you cross at Berlin, or below Harper's Ferry, your supplies for the time can be sent the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. General Meigs will, therefore, recall General Haupt and the Railroad Brigade to repair the Manassas road, so that supplies can meet you by Thoroughfare Gap or Warrenton, should you require them there. Telegraph condition of things.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 14, 1863-2. 30 p. m. (Received 3. 10 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Having performed my duty conscientiously and to the best of my ability, the censure of the President conveyed in your dispatch of 1 p. m. this day, is, in my judgment, so undeserved that I feel compelled most respectfully to ask to be immediately relieved from the command of this army.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 14, 1863-3 p. m. (Received 3. 15 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

My cavalry now occupy Falling Waters, having overtaken and captured a brigade of infantry 1, 500 strong, 2 guns, 2 caissons, 2 battle-flags, and a large number of small-arms. The enemy are all across

the Potomac.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 14, 1863-3. 30 p. m. (Received 4 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The difficulty of supplying the army in the Valley of the Shenandoah, owing to the destruction of railroad, has decided me to move by Berlin. I shall pursue and harass the retreat of the enemy with my cavalry.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 14, 1863-4. 30 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

My telegram, stating the disappointment of the President at the escape of Lee's army, was not intended as a censure, but as a stimulus