War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0091 THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

re-enforced by such troops unless they have pledged themselves to remain beyond their terms of service and until I can dispense with their services.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 11, 1863-9 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

The nine months' men told me that they were willing to serve through this crisis under any one but General Spinola, but would not serve under him, as they regarded him as worthless. You are authorized to relieve him and send him away.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 12, 1863-4. 30 p. m. (Received 8 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Upon advancing my right flank across the Antietam this morning, the enemy abandoned Funkstown and Hagerstown, and my line now extends from the latter place to Fair Play. The advance of the cavalry on the right showed the enemy to be strongly posted on the Hagerstown and Williamsport road, about 1, 5 miles from Hagerstown. On the left, the cavalry advance showed them to be in position back of Saint James' College and at Downsville. Their position runs along the high ground from Downsville to near Hagerstown. This position they are intrenching. Batteries are established on it. It is my intention to attack them to-morrow, unless something intervenes to prevent it, for the reason that delay will strengthen the enemy and will not increase my force.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 13, 1863-5 p. m. (Received 6. 40 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

In my dispatch of yesterday I stated that it was my intention to

attack the enemy to-day, unless something intervened to prevent it. Upon calling my corps commanders together and submitting the question to them, five out of six were unqualifiedly opposed to it. Under these circumstances, in view of the momentous consequences attendant upon a failure to succeed, I did not feel myself authorized to attack until after I had made more careful examination of the enemy's position, strength, and defensive works. These examinations are now being made. So far as completed, they show the enemy to be strongly intrenched on a ridge running from the rear of Hagerstown past Downsville to the Potomac. I shall continue these reconnaissances with the expectation of finding some weak point, upon which, if I succeed, I shall hazard an attack. General W. F. Smith, of the