War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0083 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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When he crosses, circumstances will determine whether it will be best to pursue him by the Shenandoah Valley or this side of Blue Ridge. There is strong evidence that he is short of artillery ammunition, and, if vigorously pressed, he must suffer.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in- Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 7, 1863.

Major-General MEADE and

Major-General FRENCH,

Frederick, Md.:

What force has been sent to Maryland Heights, and how many have reached there? It seems to me, at the present, to be a most important point, and should be held with forces sufficient to prevent its occupation by the enemy. Should his crossing above be impossible, he will probably attempt to take and hold that position until he can make the passage.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 7, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,

Frederick, Md.:

I have seen your dispatch to General Couch of 4. 40 p. m. You are perfectly right. Push forward, and fight Lee before he can cross the Potomac.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 7, 1863.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

I have received from the President the following note, which I respectfully communicate:

Major-General HALLECK:

We have certain information that Vicksburg surrendered to General Grant on the 4th of July. Now, if General Meade can complete his work, so gloriously prosecuted thus far, by the literal or substantial destruction of Lee's army, the rebellion will be over. Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 8, 1863-10. 30 a. m.

(Received 10. 45 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK:

I have ordered General Naglee, with the eight regiments of his command, to Harper's Ferry, to re-enforce General Kenly and to assume command. This will make a force of between 6, 000 and 7, 000 men. He is directed to hold his command in readiness to move forward to