War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0071 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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can be rapidly concentrated, on Pike Creek, between Middleburg and Manchester, covering my depot at Westminster. If I am not attacked, and I can from reliable intelligence have reason to believe I can attack with reasonable degree of success, I will do so; but at present, having relieved the pressure on the Susquehanna, I am now looking to the protection of Washington, and fighting my army to the best advantage.

1 P. M.

The enemy are advancing in force on Gettysburg, and I expect the battle will begin to-day.

GEO. G. MEADE.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 1, 1863-9. 15 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

Yours of 12 m. received. Your tactical arrangements for battle seem good, so far as I can judge from my knowledge of the character of the country; but in a strategic view are you not too far east, and may not Lee attempt to turn your left and cut you off from Frederick? Please give your full attention to this suggestion. Lowell's cavalry was sent this morning to escort the stores from

Harper's Ferry. This will relieve General French to obey your orders. The destruction of unguarded property on the canal along the Potomac has been terrible. Will not Frederick become a better base of supplies than Westminster? In anticipation of this, I have directed General Schenck to guard that road as well as he can. I have ordered General Couch to co-operate with you as far as possible; but I fear very little reliance can be placed on his troops in an emergency.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 1, 1863-10. 45 a. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

The movements of the enemy yesterday indicate his intention to either turn your left, or to come himself by the South Mountain and occupy Cumberland Valley. Do not let him draw you too far to the east.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

July 1, 1863-6 p. m.

(Received 10. 20 p. m., via Frederick City.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The First and Eleventh Corps have been engaged all day in front of Gettysburg. The Twelfth, Third, and Fifth have been moving up, and all, I hope, by this time on the field. This leaves only the Sixth, which will move up to-night. General Reynolds was killed this morning early in the action. I immediately sent up General