War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0063 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

army, and all accounts agree in giving Lee so large a force that I cannot believe he has left any considerable body on the south side of the Potomac. Please give me your views fully.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 28, 1863-3. 30 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Frederick, Md.:

The garrison at Harper's Ferry is under your orders. You can diminish or increase it as you think the circumstances justify.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 28, 1863-2 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Frederick, Md.:

It is reported here that the supplies at Edwards Ferry and returning by the canal are left unprotected. If so, Lee's cavalry will probably destroy them. It is reported that Lowell's battalion of cavalry, left at Poolesville, was sent to Sandy Hook, contrary to my orders. If so, there is not a cavalry picket on the line of the Potomac below Edwards Ferry, and we have none here to send out.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

FREDERICK, MD., June 28, 1863-2. 45 p. m.

(Received 4 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

I would recommend that General Schenck increase the force at Ellicott's Mills, with orders to hold that bridge and also the Relay Junction, at all hazards. The Sixth New York State Militia were ordered to be returned to General Schenck from Monocacy Bridge; also a section of artillery there. They should have started to-day.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

(Copy to General Schenck.)

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 28, 1863-3 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Frederick, Md.:

It is just reported that your train of one hundred and fifty wagons has been captured by Fitzhugh Lee, near Rockville. Unless cavalry is sent to guard your communications with Washington, they will be cut off. It is reported here is still a considerable rebel force south of the Potomac.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.