War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0054 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX]

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dleburg; has continued all day, and has receded from him, and is apparently now about White Plains; was very heavy this morning, but lighter now.

A. LINCOLN.

CAMP, June 21, 1863 - 5 p. m. (Received 5:30 p. m.)

The President:

Pleasonton's cavalry and two brigades of Meade's infantry were directed to attack Stuart's cavalry this morning. The fight commenced about 7 o'clock, and for several hours raged with great violence. As the sound receded from us, I concluded that the enemy were whipped, and I feel confident that our forces are now driving them across the Blue Ridge, perhaps at Snicker's Gap. All of the passes in the Blue Ridge, so far as I know, are stoutly held by the enemy, but I was in hopes that Pleasonton would be able to push his adversary so closely as to cross the mountain in their company.

This cavalry force has hitherto prevented me from obtaining satisfactory information as to the whereabouts of the enemy. They have masked all their movements. I have not yet received a word from the front since the beginning of the fight; from this I conclude the space between me and them has been lengthened since morning.

The cavalry and all the troops are in glorious spirits, and the former have achieved wonders in the last few days.

JOSEPH HOOKER

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 22, 1863 - 9:30 a. m. (Received 10:50 a. m.)

The PRESIDENT:

Mr. PRESIDENT: My latest advices from General Pleasonton dated 4:30 p. m., the 21st. At that time he had driven the rebel cavalry through Upperville, capturing some of his artillery, and still pursuing. Appearances favorable.

JOSEPH HOOKER

Major-General

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, D. C., June 22, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

Army of the Potomac:

Orders will be issued placing all that part of the Eighth Corps and of the Middle Department east of Cumberland under your immediate orders. The Department of Washington will continue as heretofore, your orders being given direct to General Heintzelman, he reporting them to headquarters before executing them, where they conflict with his special instructions. Affairs in Middle Department are represented as unsatisfactory. I go immediately to Baltimore to ascertain their condition.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in Chief.