War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0049 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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WASHINGTON, D. C.,

June 17, 1863-11. 40 a. m.

Major-General HOOKER,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

No reliable information of rebel movements in Maryland. All telegrams of importance received here are immediately sent to you. All telegrams from you or to you are subject to the hourly inspection of the Secretary of War and the President. No important instructions have or will be sent to you without their knowledge. It is important that the Department be kept advised of all your movements; not in detail, but their general character. Also send all the information you get of the enemy's movements and position.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

JUNE 17, 1863-2 p. m.

{Received 4 p. m.

Major-General HALLECK:

Advice of the abandonment of Harper's Ferry renders forced marches unnecessary to relieve it. This army will be in position as follows tonight: One corps at Dranesville; one corps at Guilford Station; one corps on Goose Creek, near Trappe Rock; one corps at Gum Springs; one corps at Centreville; one corps at Sangster's Station; one corps at Fairfax Station. Headquarters at Fairfax station tonight. Cavalry feeling up through Aldie toward Winchester.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

June 17, 1863-2. 10 p. m.

Major-General HOOKER,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

I regret equally with you that reports from north side of the Potomac are so unreliable and contradictory, but they are given to you as received. What is meant by abandoning Harper's Ferry is merely that General Tyler has concentrated his force in the fortifications on Maryland Heights. No enemy in any force has been seen below Harper's Ferry, north of the river, and it is hoped that Tyler's cavalry may get something reliable above. So far, we have had only the wild rumors of panic-stricken people.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 17, 1863-7. 45 p. m.

Major-General HOOKER, Army of the Potomac: My telegram of this morning [afternoon] has informed you what is meant by the abandonment of Harper's Ferry- a mere change of position. It changes in no respect the objects you are to keep in view.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

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