War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0047 Chapter XXXIX. THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 16, 1863-9. 40 p. m.

{Received 9. 50 p. m.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

My orders are out to march at 3 o'clock tomorrow morning. It will be likely to be one of vigor and power. I am prepared to move without communications with any place for ten days. I hope to reach my objective point before the arrival of Hill's corps, should it be moving in that direction. If I do not know this fact, I will shortly, but of information to the north of the Potomac I really have nothing. I wish that it might be made the duty of some person in the telegraph office in Washington to keep me informed of the enemy's movements in Maryland.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON,

June 16, 1863-10 p. m.

Major-General HOOKER:

To remove all misunderstanding, I now place you in the strict military relation to General Halleck of a commander of one of the armies to the general-in-Chief of all the armies. I have not intended differently, but as it seems to be differently understood, I shall direct him to give your orders and you to obey them.

A. LINCOLN.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

June 16, 1863-10. 15 p. m.

Major-General HOOKER,

Army of the Potomac:

I have given no directions for your army to move to Harper's Ferry. I have advised the movement of a force, sufficiently strong to meet Longstreet, on Leesburg, to ascertain where the enemy is, and then move to the relief of Harper's Ferry, or elsewhere, as circumstances might require. With the remainder of your force in proper position to support this, I want you to push out your cavalry, to ascertain something definite about the enemy. You are in command of the Army of the Potomac, and will make the particular dispositions as you deem proper. I shall only indicate the objects to be aimed at. We have no positive information of any large force against Harper's Ferry, and it cannot be known whether it will be necessary to go there until you can feel the enemy and ascertain his whereabouts.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 16, 1863.

{Received 10. 45 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

If General Cadwalader has gone to Pennsylvania, please request him to send me information of the rebel movements to the south of