War of the Rebellion: Serial 043 Page 0044 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

Search Civil War Official Records

toward Maryland, I can better fight them there than make a running fight. If they come up in front of Washington, I can threaten and cut their communications, and Dix can be re-enforced from the south to act on their rear. I could not sit still and have them turn my right. My sources of information could not successfully cover such an extent of country as their movements indicate. I add these as suggestions for your consideration.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Fairfax Station,

June 15, 1863-Midnight.

[Received June 16, 1. 15 a. m.]

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

I have received your dispatch of this evening. The Army of the Potomac is in this vicinity, excepting the Second and Sixth Corps, and, as they are marching in rear of all the trains, they will not be up before some time tomorrow. Perhaps the Second Corps will not be here until some time during tomorrow night. The First and Eleventh Corps were first to arrive on this line, but I have not yet learned whether they have drawn their supplies in readiness to march tomorrow morning or not. As soon as they are provided, they, as well as the others, will be put an route. I have been informed that the enemy nowhere crossed the Rappahannock on our withdrawal from it, but General Hill's strops moved up the river in the direction of Culpeper this morning, for the purpose, I conclude, of re-enforcing Longstreet and Ewell, wherever they may be. I request that I may be informed what troops there are at Harper's Ferry, and who is in command of them, and also who is in command in this district.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

FAIRFAX STATION,

June 16, 1863-7 a. m.

{Received 8. 35 a. m.

His Excellency President LINCOLN:

It appears to me from General Couch's dispatch of last night, * received this a. m., that nearly all the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac should at once be sent into Maryland by the most direct route. General Stahel has an abundance to perform all cavalry duty that will be required south of the Potomac. I merely make the suggestion. If any considerable body of enemy's infantry should be thrown across the Potomac, they will probably take the direction of his advance pickets, and in that event it seems to me that a heavy column of ours should be thrown as speedily as possible across the river at Harper's Ferry, while another should be thrown over the most direct line covering Baltimore and Philadelphia. I only speak with reference to this army, as I know nothing of the location or numbers of troops at the disposal of the Government elsewhere.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

---------------

*See Part III, p. 131.

---------------