War of the Rebellion: Serial 042 Page 0308 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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and furnish all the shoes we may need. In the meantime I shall continue the shoe-shops at Tyler, Austin, and Houston, which will together average 1,000 pairs shoes monthly.

I have contracted with Anderson and Richards, machinists, at Danville, Montgomery County, to make thirty spinning-jennies and one wool-carding machine, to be delivered commencing in December next, so that by January or February they will be at work spinning cotton thread and yarn in large quantities. Two jennies are at work now, and they make very good thread, equal to that from the State penitentiary. This establishment is in charge of Mr. James K. Metcalfe, of Washington County, who is under bonds to me, and, understanding the business, is erecting a factory building on his plantation at his own expense. He is assisted by Mr. Rouse (an exempt), a practical weaver, and Mr. Huebner, a practical machinist, understanding weaving machinery. Should Lieutenant-General Smith authorize the purchase. The foundry at Hempstead (as already reported to the major-general commanding), I propose to place the factory there, so us to use the steam power to drive the spindles and looms. This foundry will also enable me to make cooking utensils rapidly. Major Haynes is making camp kettles and skillets at the Marshall foundry, and will furnish me a large quantity, but when, I cannot say.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. C. WHARTON,

Major Quartermaster, Chief of Bureau.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF TEXAS,

Fort Hudson, Tex., October 13, 1863.

Honorable A. SUPERVIELE:

SIR: In accordance with instructions received from Lieutenant General Kirby Smith, commanding the Trans-Mississippi Department, through Major General J. B. Magruder, commanding District of Texas, I intrust to you a communication addressed to the Honorable John Sidell, commissioner of the Confederate States in Paris. You will proceed on the French ship of war Magellan to Vera Cruz, and there present yourself to the authorities as empowered by me to represent the facts concerning the cargo of the Love Bird, and endeavor to have it released and sent back to the Rio Grande. Should you succeed in this, you will cause the arms to be reshipped in small vessels, and, with the consent of the French authorities, sent to Tampico, with orders to remain there long enough to allay all suspicion which may have been excited in Vera Cruz as to the destination of the arms, and then to run for the Brazons Santiago bar, taking care to reach there in the night, the vessels employed for this purpose to be of such draught of water as will enable them to run up to Point Isabel (say 5 feet); there arrangements to be made by French or Mexican merchants in Vera Cruz, so as not to excite the suspicion of the Yankees.

You will then seek an interview with the admiral of the French navy, and, unless satisfied by previous conversation that he is inimical to the Confederacy, you will then hand the letter to Mr. Slidell to him for perusal, but will not leave a copy. Should you ascertain that there is in Mexico an officer who would have the power to control the movements of the French army, you will proceed to his presence and submit the letter for his perusal, with such additional facts additional facts relating thereto as may occur to you as strengthening the position of General Smith,