War of the Rebellion: Serial 042 Page 0294 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX. N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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ceived some additions since its arrival on the Washita, and numbers about 8,000 effective.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Lieutenant-General.

P. S.- I understand and base my calculations on the fact of the expedition having sailed from Berwick. Is this undoubtedly true?

HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Shreveport, La., October 8, 1863.

Major General RICHARD TAYLOR,

Commanding District of Western Louisiana:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the lieutenant-general commanding to announce to you the reception of a letter from Major Surget of the 6th instant, announcing the advance of the enemy from Berwick Bay, and to say that the concentration of the your forces in Red River Valley, advised in his letter of the 7th [8th] instant, was directed under the impression that the enemy's expedition had left Berwick Bay. As this supposition was incorrect, and the enemy appears to be in large force, your movements must be regulated by your own judgment, according to circumstances. The lieutenant-general thinks that if the enemy move toward the Sabine it would be well to hold your force at some point from which you could operate on his flank, and thus give valuable relief to General Magruder.

I am, general, very respectfully,

E. CUNNINGHAM,

Lieutenant, and Aide-de-Camp.

OPELOUSAS,

October 8, 1863.

Major General RICHARD TAYLOR,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Judge Dupre has just called to see me to give the information brought by Father Raymond, the priest at this place, just returned from New Orleans. He has been in New Orleans, the La Fourche country, and at the Bay, and returned by way of Plaquemine. He states that he has been among the enemy for the last three weeks, and from his own observations and by availing himself of the means of acquiring information which his position and calling afforded him, he gathers the following:

The advancing force of the enemy consists of two army corps, the Nineteenth and Thirteenth, the former under command of General Franklin, the latter of General Washburn. The Nineteenth numbers from 10,000 to 12,000, the Thirteenth from 12,000 to 15,000. All their wagons passed through Thibodeaux, and number four hundred (counted by the priest at Thibodeaux). Their cavalry force, he thinks, does not exceed three full regiments. General Dana, on the Mississippi coast, and near Morganza, has only about 2,000 men. The expedition is intended for Texas; is commanded by General Franklin. General Dana stated to Mr. Raymond that General Franklin would advance cautiously, driving you before him, until he could force an engagement, or in default of that, by pushing you, to demoralize your army so that he would