War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0840 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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A regiment of cavalry is being sent from Baltimore to your command. In the present condition of affairs in the West and on the Mississippi River, it will not be possible to immediately re-enforce you from that quarter. I hope, however, that General Grant may be able to spare some troops from his line. But, as I have stated, you must make your dispositions with regard only to the troops of your own army, and not so divide it as to render re-enforcements necessary for your own security.

Contingencies may arise elsewhere which will render it impossible to give you more troops at the time you ask for them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, December 11, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a dispatch from the Secretary of State,* indorsed by the Secretary of War,+ stating the relations which it is desirable that this Government should maintain with the Mexican Government and the French authorities in Mexico. I am confident there will no departure from the line of policy indicated on the Rio Grande. Major-General Dana, a discreet and able officer, is in command at Brownsville, and has been instructed that it is the purpose of this Government to avoid all complications beyond the limits of this country. I have forwarded to him a copy of the dispatch for his guidance.

I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, December 11, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: At the date of my departure from Brownsville, information had been received in Mexico by Governor Ruiz up to the 24th of October. It is probable later dates have been received by the Government at Washington.

It was represented at that time that the citizens were manifesting great energy in the defense of their county against the French invaders, military preparations being limited to the movements of State troops rather than extending to national organizations.

The French had moved from Mexico with a force of about 12,000. An equal force representing the Juarez government was between San Luis and Mexico, acting with great energy and spirit against the advanced columns of the French, and harassing them on all sides. Between the city of Mexico and Vera Cruz there was an irregular force of 6,000 Mexicans, for the purpose of attacking the communications of the French army with the coast. It was reported from San Luis that the towns which had declared for the French intervention acknowledged their adherence only so long as the French troops occupied them, and that

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*Of November 23, p. 815.

+For indorsement, see p. 846.

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