War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0800 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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ber of cavalry, infantry, and artillery in camp near Monroe, said to be 15,000. The number is doubtless exaggerated. Price's army was expected a few days since at Minden, between Monroe and Shreveport. Rations and forage were being collected there for it.

A gentlemen, recently from Texas, says that everybody is being conscripted, and that Kirby Smith expects to have 75,000 men. Another, who has been beyond Bayou Macon, says his command is now reported to number that. Large numbers of negroes are being sent from Texas and Louisiana to Shreveport, to work on the fortifications. There is some talk of arming them there. There is also a report of the rebels fortifying the Washita at some point below Monroe.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN P. HAWKINS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GOODRICH'S LANDING,

November 15, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel W. T. CLARK,

Adjutant-General, Vicksburg:

COLONEL: Early in September I wrote to General Rawlins, requesting that Springfield (rifled) muskets might be substituted for the Austrian rifles now in the hands of my troops. The letter was referred to Lieutenant [Francis H.] Parker, chief of ordnance, who wrote me, telling me how it could be managed, to save delay, to send in an inspection report, showing condition of arms, organization, &c. The corps commander approving this report was to be warrant to allow a requisition to be made for arms.

The inspection report was made some time since, and I would respectfully request that the ordnance officer at Vicksburg be directed to estimate for the arms required for the troops mentioned in the inspection report. The Austrian rifle is not fit for a soldier. It is classed a third rate by the Ordnance Department, and I see very little wisdom in requiring voluminous reports and vexatious delays before replacing them with an arm that is known to be first class. Our present arms are constantly breaking and bursting, and their fire is very inaccurate. I could not go into a fight with much confidence in their efficiency. The men fear the effect on themselves of their own fire.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN P. HAWKINS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

NEW ORLEANS, LA.,

November 15, 1863.

Major General N. P. BANKS,

Commanding Department of the Gulf, in the Field:

GENERAL: The steamer Clinton sails this afternoon, with Major-General Washburn on board, about 600 infantry, 100 horses, and wagons and ambulances.

I was informed that General Washburn had gone on the Saint Mary's, but he wisely concluded to go with the second detachment of his division.

I have ordered Brigadier-General Warren to go forward also, feeling that he would be useful with you.