War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0795 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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security which Your Honor may see fit to require, that no pecuniary loss shall result to the court, and I would not for any less reason than an imperative public necessity even seem to be disrespectful to Your Honor or your court.

I deeply regret that the marshal of the district should have taken violent measures to interrupt the occupation of the steamer ordered by me thirty-six hours since, in a way which I supposed to be perfectly consistent with Your Honor's orders concerning her. His violent measures, adopted without first referring to me, compelled me to use prompt and efficient measures to insure the prompt relief of the commander of the department.

With the highest respect, I have the honor to be, Your Honor's most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Brigadier-General, and Chief of Staff.

NEW ORLEANS,

November 12, 1863.

RUFUS WAPLES, Esq.,

United States District Attorney:

SIR: I have just had the honor to receive your letter of this date, in reply to mine of even date to His Honor Judge Durell. As soon as the great pressure of business connected with transfer of troops and supplies to General Banks will permit, I will see that the requirements of His Honor are complied with. The violent measures adopted by the marshal, referred to in my letter, consisted in his going on board the steamer Alabama with a party of deputies, and suddenly arresting the work of preparations there in progress, and in his ordering all the military employees off the vessel, where they were busily at work, in pursuance of my orders. The action taken by the marshal will detain important re-enforcements to General Banks probably one day; when his proper object (the securing of the rights of the honorable court he represented) could have been obtained in a five minutes' interview with me in my office.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE,

Brigadier-General, and Chief of Staff.

NEW ORLEANS,

November 12, 1863.

Major General N. P. BANKS,

Commanding Department of the Gulf, in the Field:

(Care of Lieutenant-Colonel Chandler, Brashear.)

GENERAL: The steamer Alabama will sail to-night to join you, carrying a battery of artillery, men, horses, and extra ammunition.

Schooners with 80 extra artillery horses will start this evening, to be towed to you; 100 extra artillery horses have been sent to-day to Brashear, to be shipped thence to you. All quiet up the river. The enemy shows strong force in front of Franklin's troops, and there has been heavy skirmishing between Vermillion and Opelousas. General Franklin all right, but should not be weakened much at present.