War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0757 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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cross the Vermillion Bayou, I will inform you of my plans. The new position of affairs seems to be among the most important developments of the war in this quarter.

I will explain to you more fully be letter. No time will be lost in raising the flag, as directed.

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, October 9, 1863.

Brigadier General CHARLES P. STONE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: When I arrived at Cairo, Rear-Admiral Porter informed me that he had already sent down three tin-clads, but said that he deemed it unnecessary as well as impracticable at the present time to send any iron-clads into this department, because of the low stage of the Mississippi. Lieutenant Ramsay leaves this morning for headquarters. I will forward dispatch by him, and start myself to-morrow morning.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[R. T. DUNHAM,]

Captain, and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, October 9, 1863.

Senior Officer in Command, U. S. Squadron, at New Orleans:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I have just received a telegram from Brigadier General Charles P. Stone, chief of staff, to the effect that-

Should any tin-clad boats from Admiral Porter's fleet arrive, the major-general commanding desires that the commanders by requested to come around immediately to Berwick Bay, to co-operate with the army in present and impending operations.

I would respectfully request that you be kind enough to notify them of this request upon their arrival, so that no time may be lost.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[J. SCHUYLER CROSBY,]

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

In the Field, October 9, 1863.

Major General E. O. C. ORD,

Commanding Thirteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding the department desires that you leave a good brigade of your corps at the town of Franklin, for the purpose of forming a point of support for trains and small bodies of troops along the line of operations.

The commander of the brigade should be instructed to keep his command perfectly in hand, and be very vigilant to prevent surprise by small guerrilla parties, which may be expected to attempt to annoy the line of communications.