War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0735 Chapter XXXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 79.

Carrollton, La., September 24, 1863.

I. Major General F. J. Herron is relieved from the command of the Second Division, Thirteenth Army Corps. He will report in person to these headquarters.

II. Major General N. J. T. Dana, having by virtue of orders from Washington reported for duty with the Thirteenth Army Corps, is assigned to the command of the Second Division, Thirteenth Army Corps.

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By order of Major General E. O. C. Ord:

WALTER B. SCATES,

Lieutenant Colonel, and Asst. Adjt. General, Thirteenth Army Corps.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, September 26, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Major-General Franklin reports from Berwick Bay that Weitzel's and McMillan's divisions of the Nineteenth Army Corps will be at Bisland to-day (26th). The obstructions to the navigation of the Teche Bayou are being rapidly removed. The Thirteenth Corps is crossing the bay, and the troops will all be over to-night. As soon as the obstructions in the Teche Bayou can be removed, which will be speedily, we shall advance. General Taylor is represented to be between Opelousas and Bisland, with 10,000 to 15,000 men. I bear in mind constantly the instructions of the Government as to Texas, and shall lose on time in doing all that is required of me so far as the mans in my hands render possible.

I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, September 26, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to call the attention of the Government to the subject of charities in this department. Upon my arrival here, I found, under the administration of General Butler, that nearly eleven thousand families were supported in great part by the Government.

Notwithstanding a very large increase of population and of soldiers, more or less of whom have destitute families, by very close examination into the disbursements of these charities, and the correction of all abuses, we have reduced the number from eleven thousand to about six thousand families, and ten large asylums. These probably include 24,000 persons.

By the general order of the War Department, all property has been turned over to the agents of the Treasury Department, and it will be impossible for me to continue the charities as heretofore.

They should be transferred to the Treasury Department with the transfer of confiscated or abandoned property, which ought to be applied