War of the Rebellion: Serial 041 Page 0664 W. FLA., S. ALA., S. MISS., LA., TEX., N. MEX. Chapter XXXVIII.

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field, will leave neither time nor inclination for vexatious discussing of a subject with which as soldiers they have no concern.

By command of Brigadier General George L. Andrews:

GEO. B. HALSTED,

Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON,

July 30, 1863 - 4.30 p. m.

Major-General GRANT,

Vicksburg, Miss.:

You will send Major-General Banks a corps of 10,000 or 12,000 men, to report at such point as he may designate; probably at New Orleans.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 31, 1863 - 6 p. m.

Major-General BANKS,

New Orleans, via Cairo and Vicksburg:

General Grant has been ordered to send you a corps of 10,000 or 12,000 men for operations west. Get everything ready. We are only waiting for your answer to my dispatch of the 24th.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WASHINGTON,

July 31, 1863.

Major-General BANKS,

New Orleans, La.:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of July 23 is just received. It is impossible at present to send you a single man from the north. We must wait the enforcement of the draft. General Grant has been directed to send you a corps of 10,000 or 12,000 men. As soon as the expedition now in Arkansas occupied Arkansas River, more troops can be sent to you or to Red River.

It is important that we immediately occupy some point or points in Texas. Whether the movement should be made by land or water is not yet decided. We shall wait your answer to my dispatch of the 24th. In the meantime every preparation should be made. If be water, Admiral Farragut will co-operate.

The Navy Department recommends Indianapolis as the point of landing. It seems to me that this point is to distant, as it will leave the expedition isolated from New Orleans. If the landing can be made at Galveston, the country between that place and New Orleans can be soon cleaned out, and the enemy be prevented from operating successively upon these places. In other words, you can venture to send a larger force to Galveston than you can to Indianola.

I merely throw out these suggestions deciding upon any definite plan till I receive answer to the former dispatch.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.